Cinemaholics Podcast #218 – The Mitchells vs. the Machines

It’s Negroni vs. Ashton on this week’s episode of Cinemaholics. That’s right, we’re reviewing The Mitchells vs. the Machines, the latest Sony Animation movie, now being released on Netflix. Most critics are loving this animated sci-fi family film, but the real fur is about to fly over the podcast airwaves. Also on the show, we’re covering Without Remorse, the latest Tom Clancy adaption, this time starring Michael B. Jordan and coming straight to Amazon Prime Video. There’s also Limbo from director Ben Sharrock, The Outside Story starring Brian Tyree Henry, and finally The Disciple, an Indian festival darling that just dropped on Netflix.

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‘Limbo’ offers a wryly funny take on the refugee experience

As we’re typically reminded by today’s news cycles, the immigrant experience is fraught with hardships and humility. The act of separating oneself from their homeland, their family, and sometimes their heritage causes one to drift between one nation to another, caught between two lands but never feeling connected to either — sometimes for a grueling sense of time. You’re caught in a perpetual state of limbo, which is befitting of sophomore writer/director Ben Sharrock’s BAFTA-nominated movie of the same name. To try to mine comedy from such a difficult experience can seem like a dangerous proposition, especially these days.

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Extra Milestone – A Place in the Sun (1951)

Our film anniversary this month belongs to the romantic drama Charlie Chaplin once called “the greatest movie ever made about America.” That’s right, we’re diving into A Place in the Sun, starring Montgomery Clift, Elizabeth Taylor, and Shelley Winters, with supporting turns from Anne Revere and Raymond Burr. Directed by George Stevens and written by Harry Brown and Michael Wilson, this awards-heavy favorite among classic film lovers celebrates 70 years since premiering at the Cannes Film Festival in 1951, and it was the second film adaptation of the 1925 novel An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser, which was also a place of the same name.

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Sam Wilson’s first speech as Captain America is important, but will it even matter?

So, we’re finally here. Last week was the finale of “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier,” a Marvel/Disney limited series that for the last six weeks has been absolutely dominating my television screen as much as it has my mind. Being a fan of Marvel’s live-action superhero ventures since I was a kid in 2008, it wasn’t hard for TFATWS to catch my eye. But while I came for the heroics, action, and quippy one-liners, what really compelled me (and many viewers) to stay were the mostly poignant and deep conversations about race, status, and the humanity of our favorite, godlike heroes. Key word: “mostly.”

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Cinemaholics Podcast #217 – Mortal Kombat

Get over here? More like get over it! Anyway, this week on the show we talk about Mortal Kombat, a reboot of the film franchise based on the series of video games that just hit HBO Max and is now playing in theaters. We also review Stowaway, a new sci-fi thriller on Netflix. And we finish the show with a review of Together Together, a quirky Sundance comedy that is now in limited release. And if you’re curious what we thought of the Oscars 2021 ceremony, we open the show with some of our brief thoughts.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – ‘Shadow and Bone’ Season 1 Review

Special guest Alisha Grauso joins the show for a bonus discussion of “Shadow and Bone,” a brand new dark fantasy series that just hit Netflix. We chat about how the show measures up to the first book in the Shadow and Bone trilogy by Leigh Bardugo, plus how newcomers to the story might get instantly hooked on this intriguing and unique world filled with “magic” (or small science?) and swashbuckling thieving crews.

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Oscars 2021 – If We Picked the Winners!

On this special bonus episode of Cinemaholics, we pick our own winners for the 2021 Academy Awards. Inspired by the Siskel and Ebert classic format, we go through the nominees of almost every category and explain our respective choices.

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‘The Falcon And The Winter Soldier’ has finally addressed the ‘truth’ about America

The fifth and penultimate episode of TFATWS is called “Truth,” and that’s certainly no accident. After leaving us for an entire week with the final image of Cap’s blood-soaked shield stuck in our minds, TFATWS replaces it with even more memorable scenes and heavy imagery. Each of them are arguably just as hard to swallow as John Walker’s closing scene from the week prior.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #216 – Monday

Come fly to Greece with us for a weekend of reviews we’ll never forget. This week our main review is the new romance dramedy Monday, which stars Sebastian Stan and Denise Gough as two self-destructive lovers. We also have some brief Oscars talk and quickly review Ben Wheatley’s new sci-fi indie, In the Earth. Last, […]

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Snarcasm: Great, now they’re putting politics into MY Captain America!

A few years ago, I did a frequent column called “Snarcasm,” where I would break down a ridiculous piece of film writing using both snark and sarcasm (I’ve never been a creative person). Well, lately, I’ve been meaning to bring the format back again, because let’s face it, the internet seems to just be getting worse.

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‘The Falcon And The Winter Soldier’ makes a bloody case for why we might need fewer superheroes

Roughly 13 years have gone by since the release of Iron Man, the film that introduced us to the Marvel Cinematic Universe — that may not seem like a long time, but keep in mind that last year (2020) counted as at least five. This, mixed with the fact that currently 23 movies and two limited series have come out since, proves it’s pretty impossible to undermine the legacy and longevity of the MCU. But as time goes on, this sprawling superhero franchise has seen quite a few major changes. The Avengers ushered in a “Heroic Age” of superhero films, but we now see Marvel attempting to dissect those very heroic ideals that previous films were built on.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #215 – Voyagers

The teens aren’t all right on this week’s show. Our first review of the week is Voyagers, a new sci-fi drama from Neil Burger starring Tye Sheridan, Lily-Rose Depp, Fionn Whitehead, and Colin Farrell, which just launched in theaters. We also discuss Thunder Force, Netflix’s superhero action comedy from Ben Falcone and Melissa McCarthy, who co-stars in the film alongside Octavia Spencer. Last, we hit the slippery slopes of Slalom, a festival indie skiing drama from up-and-coming French director Charlène Favier.

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‘The Falcon And The Winter Soldier’ is finally exploring the humanity of Marvel’s heroes

The third episode of TFATWS ushers us into the halfway point of the series. With just three episodes left after it, Episode 3 strives to reveal as much as it can about the secrets of the Super Soldier serum, which has oft been alluded to since the beginning of the show. “Power Broker” delivers on this goal using seedy locales, lurking threats, and an unlikely alliance between Sam, Bucky, and Helmut Zemo (the villain from Captain America: Civil War, portrayed once again by Daniel Brühl).

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Cinemaholics Podcast #214 – Shiva Baby

Our main review this week is Shiva Baby, a new festival darling dark comedy written and directed by Emma Seligman in her feature film debut. In addition to discussing that film, along with Netflix’s Concrete Cowboy and Hulu’s WeWork: Or the Making and Breaking of a $47 Billion Unicorn, we discuss the new trailer for Space Jam: A New Legacy and debate whether or not Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is good. Plus we go on a weird rant about streaming services as high school cliques.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Godzilla vs. Kong

It’s Jon vs. Will on this week’s bonus episode of Cinemaholics. Who will prevail? Hard to say. But they do their best to battle out their differing takes on not only Godzilla vs. Kong, but Legendary’s overall “MonsterVerse” to date. Their latest effort comes to us from director Adam Wingard and stars Alexander Skarsgård, Millie Bobby Brown, Rebecca Hall, Brian Tyree Henry, Shun Oguri, Eiza González, Julian Dennison, Kyle Chandler, and Demián Bichir.

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‘Godzilla vs. Kong’ is the unrelenting monster smash-up you’ve been waiting for

Godzilla vs. Kong comes packaged with an easy enough proposition for monster movie fans who’ve been craving something larger than life to hit their screen this year. It’s the culmination of several films all building upon one another since Gareth Edwards’ reboot of the central character in 2014, but the irony is that you don’t really need to see any of those films (or remember what happened in them, honestly) in order to get the full experience of this globe-trotting, city-smashing, Kaiju death match.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #213 – Nobody

Bob Odenkirk is an unlikely action hero in Nobody, a new thriller from Ilya Naishuller, the director of Hardcore Henry. We discuss the film and Odenkirk’s surprising turn in it as a seemingly mediocre guy who goes full John Wick when a mob of Russians begins to target him and his family. Afterward, we discuss Bad Trip on Netflix and The Courier, which recently hit theaters.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Invincible

Special guest Mekishana Pierre joins us today for a bonus review of “Invincible,” a new animated superhero show created by Robert Kirkman and adapted from his 2003 comic book series. We discuss our general, spoiler-three thoughts on the first three episodes of the series, which you can watch right now on Amazon Prime Video. And the show features a stellar voice cast: Steven Yeun, J.K. Simmons, Sandra Oh, Walton Goggins, and many more.

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Extra Milestone – Gilda (1946)

This month on Extra Milestone, we jump back in time 75 years to discuss Gilda, a cult classic film noir starring Rita Hayworth, Glenn Ford, and George Macready. Directed by Charles Vidor and co-written by Jo Eisinger and Marion Parsonnet (with an uncredited contribution from Ben Hecht), the story is adapted from the work of E.A. Ellington, and it centers around gambling con man Johnny Farrell (Ford), whose amoral casino boss Ballin (Macready) surprises him with the revelation of his new, striking wife Gilda (Hayworth). We discuss the film’s resonant themes all these years later, its impact on the noir genre, and how the film relates to other iconic dramas from the era.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Zack Snyder’s Justice League

Don’t worry, this shouldn’t take four hours. Special guest Adonis Gonzalez joins us to review Zack Snyder’s Justice League, the epic “Snydercut” or director’s cut of the 2017 superteam movie dud, which has just premiered on HBO Max. We discuss the legacy of Zack Snyder’s filmography, his work on the DCEU (DC Extended Universe), and the potential future of DC superheroes on the big screen.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #212 – The Best Films of SXSW 2021

South By Southwest 2021 was held virtually this year, and its film festival portion certainly had plenty to offer all you Cinemaholics. We get into some of our general thoughts of the festival and discuss common themes between the premieres. Plus we dig into our favorite films, from indie headliners like The Fallout and Violet to crowd-pleasing darlings like Language Lessons and Best Summer Ever. And finally we touch on some of the buzziest narrative features and documentaries of the fest, which include Demi Lovato: Dancing with the Devil, Alone Together, and plenty more.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #211 – Cherry

Tom Holland and Ciara Bravo star in Cherry, a new heavy drama on Apple TV+ from the Russo Brothers. We discuss the film and its interesting…perspectives on this week’s show, along with reviews for Yes Day, Kid90, and The Last Right. We open the show with a quick, super-serious crossover with Biff and Marty from Collision Movie Smackdown, in which they interview “Tom Holland.”

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‘Zack Snyder’s Justice League’ offers an alternate universe of superhero fatigue

There’s nothing quite like Zack Snyder’s Justice League, a film that feels more like a big-budget HBO mini-series in terms of format, but with all the whiz bang pop of a billion dollar summer blockbuster. It’s certainly bloated, though it’s coming out at a time when audiences are more starved than ever when it comes to cinematic spectacle. It’s about as ambitious in its labrynth of costumed subplots as something like Captain America: Civil War, but it’s a far more coherent and narratively rewarding picture than a lot of what Snyder has produced before, particularly compared to the mess of misery that was Dawn of Justice.

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‘WandaVision’ Proves That Love in the MCU can Actually Mean Something

It’s been a week since the exciting conclusion to “WandaVision” graced our screens. The Disney+ original series captured the attention of new and old MCU fans alike with its first bizarre and eye-catching premiere on January 15, and not much has changed eight episodes later. Every episode was wrought with fan theories, speculation, and nail-biting anticipation for the next week. And now, it’s over. The sun has set on yet another chapter in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and “WandaVision” certainly went out with a bang. The finale featured some of the best action sequences and most crushing emotional moments in the entire (limited) series. The stellar acting from the cast, including Elizabeth Olsen, Kathryn Hahn, Teyonah Parris and Paul Bettany, only helped catapult the positive reception of the finale, and it helped cement “WandaVision” as one of the must-watch shows of the year.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge on the Run

Special guest Matt Serafini joins us this week for a bonus review of The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge on the Run, which is now available to stream on Paramount+. In addition to discussing this third movie about everyone’s favorite undersea sponge, we also wax poetic about the ongoing legacy of “SpongeBob SquarePants” and its impact on pop culture over the last 20 years.

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‘The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge On The Run’ Is bearably barnacles

The undersea adventures of SpongeBob and his Bikini Bottom-dwelling fans have been going on since 1999, entertaining multiple generations and sparking that age-old debate about which era of the sea sponge’s escapades is the best. Well, it’s not much of a debate per se, it’s more like the original generation of viewers (now fully-grown adults) yelling at the younger generation, who don’t seem to be paying much attention because they’re too busy trying to watch “SpongeBob.”

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Cinemaholics Podcast #210 – Raya and the Last Dragon

We’re going on an adventure this week in our review of Raya and the Last Dragon, a new action-adventure film from Walt Disney Animation featuring the voice talents of Kelly Marie Tran, Awkwafina, Gemma Chan, Benedict Wong, Sandra Oh, and Daniel Dae Kim. Later in the show, we also review Coming 2 America, Sophie Jones, and Moxie. And we open the episode with a quick tribute to our cohost Abby Olcese, who will be departing Cinemaholics starting next week.

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Eddie Huang’s ‘Boogie’ drops the ball

It’s not often we get a memoirist’s perspective on film. There are plenty of instances where directors write autobiographies, certainly. And there are plenty of novelists who’ve made the leap into screenwriting and directing. But it’s pretty rare for an author known for his best-selling life story to make the jump behind-the-camera. Of course, Eddie Huang hasn’t lived an ordinary life. The Fresh Off the Boat writer is an attorney, producer, television host, food personality, chef, and restaurateur, complete with his own gua bao eatery in Lower Manhattan, which gives you a glimpse into his wide-ranging skill set. This is a guy who really knows how to expand his reach.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #209 – Tom & Jerry

Unlike Tom the cat and Jerry the mouse, we actually speak in this week’s show, as we discuss the new live-action family comedy Tom & Jerry, which just hit HBO Max and puts the classic Hanna-Barbera cartoon characters into New York City with a host of human characters you definitely won’t care about. We also review The United States vs. Billie Holiday on Hulu and Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry on Apple TV+. Plus, we do a quick mini review of The Mauritanian and play some listener voicemails.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Behind Her Eyes

Special guest Amanda the Jedi joins the show for a bonus review of “Behind Her Eyes,” a new psychological-thriller limited series from Netflix created by Steve Lightfoot and based on Sarah Pinborough’s novel of the same name. The story follows Louise, a single mother played by Simona Brown, who sparks a love affair with her new boss David, a psychiatrist played by Tom Bateman. She only later realizes however that he is already married to a woman named Adele, played by Eve Hewson. And before Louise knows it, she’s begun a secret friendship with the wife of the man she’s pining for.

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Extra Milestone – The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

This month’s Extra Milestone discussion is The Silence of the Lambs, which recently celebrated its 30th anniversary. We discuss the ongoing legacy of this perennial classic from director Jonathan Demme and screenwriter Ted Tally (adapted from the novel by Thomas Harris), including how it shaped the modern landscape of true crime filmmaking and left a lasting impact on perceptions of the transgender community. We also discuss the iconic performances of Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, and Ted Levine, who portray Clarice Starling, Hannibal Lecter, and Buffalo Bill, respectively. Then finish with a deep dive on the film’s ending.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #208 – I Care a Lot

If you care a lot about all the new releases this week, then you’ve come to the right place. This week we discuss the new Netflix dark comedy thriller I Care a Lot, which stars Rosamund Pike as a ruthless con artist (Con Girl?) who meets her match when crossing a gangster (Peter Dinklage) and his mother (Dianne Weist). We also review Minari, Flora & Ulysses, and a few other films that just hit theatrical and on demand. And toward the beginning of the show we discuss our preferred way of watching TV shows and play some listener voicemails.

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Interview – Yuh-Jung Youn Talks ‘Minari,’ Discrimination, and the Truth Behind the American Dream

Yuh-Jung Youn is a legendary Korean actor whose film and television work spans over 55 years. In the new A24 film, Minari, she stars alongside Steven Yeun, Han Ye-ri, Alan Kim, Noel Kate Cho, and Will Patton as the grandmother of an immigrant family trying to achieve the American Dream in 1980s rural Arkansas. The film was directed and written by Lee Isaac Chung, and Yuh-Jung is now the first Korean actress to ever be nominated for a Screen Actors Guild award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role. I spoke with Yuh-Jung about Minari, the current state of the entertainment industry, and why this film will hopefully resonate with people of all backgrounds.You can listen to the full interview as a podcast (above) or read the edited transcript (below).

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Cinemaholics Podcast #207 – Judas and the Black Messiah

After a few weeks apart, the Cinemaholics trio is back together again! And our main review discussion this week is Shaka King’s Judas and the Black Messiah, a buzzy awards-level movie on HBO Max starring Daniel Kaluuya as the iconic Black Panther Fred Hampton and Lakeith Stanfield as the “Judas” who betrayed him in late-60s Chicago. We also continue our discussion about movie trailers from last week and review To All the Boys: Always and Forever, Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar, and The Map of Tiny Perfect Things.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel

Special guest Chris Vognar joins us for a bonus review of “Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel,” a new 4-part, true-crime documentary series on Netflix from Joe Berlinger. It gives a comprehensive account of Elisa Lam’s tragic disappearance in 2013, and how it may or may not be related to the eery, notorious, infamous, and downright spooky Hotel Cecil located in downtown Los Angeles.

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Robin Wright’s ‘Land’ is a Vacant Directorial Debut with a Few Notable Peaks

Throughout a nearly four-decade acting career, Robin Wright has capably channeled characters who carry a patient, dutiful sense of longing and/or silent dignity. Be it The Princess Bride, Forrest Gump, The Congress, or Netflix’s House of Cards, to name only a few notable movies and shows, Wright has often demonstrated a great talent for playing patient, mature women with complicated feelings and careful thinking.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #206 – Malcolm and Marie

If you’ve ever overhead an argument between Jon and Will right here on Cinemaholics, you’re pretty much prepared for Malcolm and Marie, a new Netflix film directed and written by Sam Levinson. This enclosed black-and-white drama stars Zendaya and John David Washington, and critics are pretty split on this film about relationships and, well, critics. Also in the show, we play some listener voicemails about the state of movie trailers and review several other new films, which include A Glitch in the Matrix, Little Fish, and more.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Sundance 2021 Recap

Special guest Cory Woodroof joins us for our recap of the 2021 Sundance Film Festival. We discuss our favorite films of the fest, plus some of the buzziest flicks you’ll probably hear more about in the year ahead.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #205 – The Little Things

Special guest Kimber Myers joins Abby this week to talk about The Little Things, a neo-noir crime thriller on HBO Max starring Denzel Washington, Rami Malek, Jared Leto, and Natalie Morales. They also discuss Palmer, which just came out on Apple TV+ and stars Justin Timberlake and Juno Temple.

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Extra Milestone – City Lights (1931)

For our first official milestone of 2021, we’re discussing Charlie Chaplin’s classic silent film City Lights, which this month celebrates its 90th anniversary since release. This long-celebrated romantic comedy was of course written, directed, and produced by Chaplin, who also stars in it as his iconic character, the Tramp. Along for the ride is Virginia Cherrill as the blind girl who wins the Tramp’s heart, Florence Lee as her grandmother, Harry Myers as the drunken millionaire, and plenty more.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #204 – News of the World

Start spreading the news. The Cinemaholics are back this week to discuss the latest Tom Hanks movie directed by Paul Greengrass, which just happens to be a western set in post-Civil War Texas. Fun! We also review The White Tiger, In & of Itself, Our Friend, Some Kind of Heaven, and The Marksman.

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‘WandaVision’ Episode 3 Recap – Surprises In All Shapes And Sizes

We’re only a third of the way through “WandaVision,” but if this recent episode is any indication, we can expect an avalanche of strange occurrences and sudden twists to occur every single week. Episode 3 of “WandaVision,” aptly titled “Now in Color,” comes to Disney+ with another 40 minutes of laughs, love, and absolute madness. The show starts off how the second episode ended, in brand spanking new technicolor!

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‘WandaVision’ Is Different And Familiar All At Once

For those unaware, “WandaVision” is the newest project from Marvel Studios, and it’s the first in a long line of miniseries that all share a connection to each other and the greater Marvel Cinematic Universe. It follows everyone’s favorite odd couple — Wanda Maximoff and Vision (last name not included) — after the events of Avengers: Endgame. Back when this idea was first announced, it was met with excitement from some and exhaustion from others. I’m only a little bit ashamed to admit that for a while, I landed on the latter.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #203 – One Night in Miami

One afternoon on a Sunday, the Cinemaholics got together to review Regina King’s debut feature film, One Night in Miami, which stars Kingsley Ben-Adir, Leslie Odom Jr, Eli Goree, and Aldis Hodge. Also in this episode, you’ll hear some mini reviews for “WandaVision,” The Ultimate Playlist of Noise, and more. And some extended discussion over Locked Down and Herself.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #202 – Top 10 Films of 2020

OK, “reel” talk. 2020 was…interesting. It was definitely the most unique year of film in the last century of moviegoing. But throughout all the weirdness, we here at Cinemaholics found ourselves captivated by no small number of great projects from veteran filmmakers, first-time directors, and plenty of independent voices. In our annual “best of the year” show, we each discuss our general thoughts on 2020, our honorable mentions, and of course, our respective Top 10 choices. Plus, we share voicemails from some of you listeners discussing your favorite films of 2020.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #201 – Pieces of a Woman, Sylvie’s Love, The Midnight Sky

We’re celebrating the new year with some tonally different new movies this week. First up is Pieces of a Woman, a new melodrama hitting Netflix this week, which stars Vanessa Kirby and Shia LaBeouf. Then we get into Sylvie’s Love, a new throwback romance on Amazon Prime starring Tessa Thompson and Nnamdi Asomugha. Finally, Will and Abby discuss The Midnight Sky on Netflix, directed by George Clooney, who also stars in the film alongside Felicity Jones. We also cover a few mini reviews in Off-Topics, which include “Cobra Kai” Season 3, We Can Be Heroes, Shadow in the Cloud, and News of the World.

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Extra Milestone – Brazil (1985), Edward Scissorhands (1990)

To officially conclude this year’s Extra Milestone lineup, Jon Negroni and Will Ashton of the Cinemaholics podcast joined forces with me one last time to discuss two distinct (and oddly holiday-centric) auteur-driven classics. We start our conversation by digging through the muck of Terry Gilliam’s Brazil, a bureaucratic odyssey of madness often regarded as one of the greatest films of all time. After that, we jump forward to Edward Scissorhands, an intensely personal story from Tim Burton that is both lighthearted and melancholy, and which has affected us all at one point or another.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #200 – Soul, Wonder Woman 1984, Promising Young Woman

We had an out-of-body experience over the holidays checking out some major blockbuster films that hit streaming instead of theaters. There’s Pixar’s Soul, the latest from Pete Docter, which stars Jamie Foxx and Tina Fey. And we also cover the controversial Wonder Woman 1984 from Patty Jenkins, which stars Gal Gadot, Christ Pine, Kristen Wiig, and Pedro Pascal. Finally, we end the show with review of Emerald Fennell’s Promising Young Woman, another controversial film that was a hit on the festival circuit, and it stars Carey Mulligan and Bo Burnham.

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Holiday Special – Our Favorite Alternative Christmas Movies

We love watching movies around Christmastime, but we all have our favorite “unconventional” picks for the holiday season. Julia Teti joins us for a bonus discussion to discuss some of the best alternative Christmas movies, from recent favorites like Hustlers to perennial classics like The Apartment (which Julia contends is a New Year’s Movie for some reason).

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In ‘Promising Young Woman,’ Carey Mulligan and Emerald Fennell Stick it to the Man

Promising Young Woman is mad. Damn mad. And it damn well should be. The feature screenwriting and directorial debut of Emerald Fennell (Killing Eve) is a consciously, thoughtfully thorny and confrontational revenge story, driven boldly by its star performance from Carey Mulligan. It tensely and intently examines the #MeToo era with a bold disregard for what anyone might think or say. Filled with simmering rage, and a film that’s often eager to examine the layers of hypocrisies through which a “boys will be boys” culture has been formed in institutions over the course of generations, this cinematic takedown is a vibrant effort to dispel “nice guys” and dismantle a society that often sides with men while disrupting women’s futures in the process.

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Extra Milestone – Barry Lyndon (1975), Spartacus (1960), Ran (1985)

Welcome to (perhaps) the largest Extra Milestone yet! In an Anyway, That’s All I Got reunion for the ages, I’m joined by Anthony Battaglia, Guy Simons Jr., and Jason Read to discuss three of the biggest epics of the 21st century! First up is Barry Lyndon, the passion project of Stanley Kubrick released in 1975, and a film that’s quite well-loved among hardcore cinephiles. After that, we circle back to Spartacus, an earlier Kubrick film that is rarely discussed in the context of his filmography, and perhaps for just reason! Finally, we jump forward to another one of the great directors with Ran, Akira Kurosawa’s massive and operatic masterpiece from 1985, and which only one of us had seen!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #199 – Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, Nomadland, Greenland, Small Axe

We’re sounding off this week for Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, the new Netflix film that has Oscars in its sights for Viola Davis and the late Chadwick Boseman. We also cover Nomadland, a Best Picture frontrunner from writer/director Chloé Zhao and starring Frances McDormand. And there’s also Greenland, the newest Gerard Butler disaster flick that is surprisingly decent! Last, we do a retrospective of Small Axe, a collection of five films from director Steve McQueen, which you can now stream on Amazon Prime Video.

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Extra Milestone – Battleship Potemkin (1925), Harvey (1950), Clue (1985)

Emily Kubincanek makes her welcomed and triumphant return to Extra Milestone, and this week’s selections are among the most varied yet! We begin by celebrating the 95-year anniversary of Sergei Eisenstein’s magnum opus Battleship Potemkin, a film more fundamentally significant than almost any other when it comes to the art form of editing and propaganda storytelling. After that, we take a lighthearted and melancholy stroll into the world of Henry Koster’s Harvey, a rich and complex comedy featuring one of the best performances by the great James Stewart. Finally, we get to the bottom of Jonathan Lynn’s Clue, a cult-classic murder mystery that neither of us had seen before, and were delighted to discover was great!

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Interview – Colman Domingo Talks ‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’ and Working with Chadwick Boseman

Colman Domingo stars alongside Viola Davis and Chadwick Boseman in Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom, which hits Netflix on December 18 after its limited theatrical release. In addition to his acting work in films like If Beale Street Could Talk, Assassination Nation, Zola, and the upcoming Candyman, Domingo brings a wealth of experience as a writer, director, producer and actor on the stage, making him an obvious choice for Ma Rainey, which is based on the August Wilson play. I talked about the film with Domingo over Zoom, as well as his acting influences, his camaraderie with the late Chadwick Boseman, and what film lovers might get out of George C. Wolfe’s latest directorial effort.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #198 – The Prom, I’m Your Woman, Let Them All Talk, Wolfwalkers, Wander Darkly, Songbird

The holiday season is upon us, so you know what that means! Time to celebrate the…prom? Well, OK, we’re really celebrating the annual big-budget December movie musical, which this year is Ryan Murphy’s The Prom, now streaming on Netflix and starring Meryl Streep, James Corden, Nicole Kidman, and Keegan-Michael Key. We cover several other movies as well, which include Julia Hart’s new indie noir drama I’m Your Woman on Amazon Prime Video starring Rachel Brosnahan, Steven Soderbergh’s Let Them All Talk (also starring Meryl Streep) on HBO Max, the hand-drawn animated film Wolfwalkers on Apple TV+, the time-bending indie Wander Darkly starring Diego Luna and Sienna Miller, and Songbird, which stars KJ Apa and Sofia Carson.

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The Big Stream – What’s Disney’s New Streaming Strategy?

Cinemaholics is now doing a live stream! It’s called The Big Stream, and it’s our new destination for all things movie industry news and extra off-topics we don’t have time to cover on the main show. Yesterday, I kicked off a conversation about Disney Investor Day, and how these massive show/movie announcements for Star Wars, Marvel, Pixar, and Disney Animation signal a new streaming strategy for Disney+, Hulu, and…Star?

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Extra Milestone – Heat (1995), Gimme Shelter (1970)

This week on Extra Milestone, I’m joined by returning guest and fellow cinephile Andrew McMahon to break down an enticing double feature spanning numerous decades and genres. First up is a cinematic and musical appetizer in the form of Gimme Shelter, the iconic Rolling Stones documentary directed by Charlotte Zwerin and the Maysles Brothers, chronicling the doomed Altamont Speedway concert outside of San Francisco in December of 1969, a tragic failure that swiftly signaled the downfall of the Counterculture Movement. After that, we jump forward to Michael Mann’s Heat, a stylish and captivating crime drama featuring the first onscreen collaboration between Al Pacino and Robert De Niro, and which has maintained its legacy as one of the best films of its kind.

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‘Monday’ Review – TIFF 2020

Monday, the latest film from director Argyris Papadimitropoulos (Suntan), is a splashy and sensationalized effort, one that’ll possibly turn some folks off its intentional, unabashed abrasiveness. The response to the film’s debut appears to be divided, and understandably so. Seemingly by design, Papadimitropoulos’ latest film is a claustrophobic and unsettled viewing experience, and it matches the restless, unbridled feelings of our lovestruck, then lovelorn characters. If you don’t care for these characters, essentially, then you’re gonna have a hard time falling for this movie. Especially since the filmmakers seemingly don’t care if you like them or not. They’re not the most endearing duo, but they’re certainly amusing to watch in their debauchery. Well, at least, until they aren’t. Perhaps I’m getting ahead of myself already.

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‘Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom’ Review – Get Ready For The Best

If you told me there was a movie being made about Ma Rainey, the legendary blues singer who inspired the likes of Bessie Smith and Langston Hughes, I’d sit back and buckle in for a jazz-filled good time. If you told me the movie was based off a play written by August Wilson of Fences fame, I would immediately unbuckle myself to go and grab a pair of tissues.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #197 – Mank, Sound of Metal, Black Bear, Godmothered

Cinemaholics is what you Mank of it. Which is why we’re reviewing David Fincher’s latest film, Mank, now streaming on Netflix and starring Gary Oldman, Amanda Seyfried, and Charles Dance. Manks in advance for listening. We also review Sound of Metal starring Riz Ahmed and Olivia Cooke, Black Bear starring Aubrey Plaza and Christopher Abbot, and Godmothered starring Jillian Bell, Isla Fisher, and June Squibb.

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David Fincher’s ‘Mank’ is an Artistically Gray Love Letter Addressed to No One in Particular

The films of David Fincher tend to obsess over the genius of severely tragic and damaged characters. So it’s no surprise that Mank, a period biopic now on Netflix about screenwriter Herman J. Mankiewicz, has been on Fincher’s cinematic to-do list for many years. His father, Jack Fincher, wrote the screenplay decades ago, but he passed before ever having a chance to see the film brought to the big screen. Now, arguably still at the peak of his filmmaking career, David Fincher returns to deliver this biting treatise on the making of Citizen Kane, without ever really exploring the classic film’s most fascinating details.

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Extra Milestone – Toy Story (1995), Unbreakable (2000)

This week on Extra Milestone, I’m joined once more by my good friend Guy Simons Jr. to dissect a pair of (relatively) recent classics that have garnered acclaim over the years, and which have almost nothing whatsoever to do with each other! First up is Pixar’s groundbreaking debut feature Toy Story, the first-ever wholly computer animated movie that has gained a reputation as an indispensable landmark in special effects and storytelling. After that, we jump ahead to M. Night Shyamalan’s unconventional superhero story Unbreakable, a grounded deconstruction of the genre that arrived before cinema as a whole had become swept up in comic book storytelling, and which has amassed a sizable (and well-earned) cult following.

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’76 Days’ Film Review – TIFF 2020

It’ll take some time before we really come to terms with the depths of COVID-19’s devastation. It’s hard to grapple with the severity of a disaster when you’re still caught in the eye of the storm. We haven’t seen the last of this deadly and debilitating disease, and it’s hard to know when we ever will. A year ago, you hardly heard a single soul utter the word “coronavirus.” Now, it’s hard to have a conversation where it’s not mentioned in the first few seconds. We’re in a new normal for the time being, and we shouldn’t take it lightly. Because at least for the United States, the worst is yet to come, unfortunately.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #196 – Happiest Season, Lovers Rock, The Twentieth Century, Uncle Frank, Zappa

Not all of us are in love with Clea DuVall’s latest film, Happiest Season, which is a Christmas romantic comedy on Hulu starring Kristen Stewart, Mackenzie Davis, Aubrey Plaza, and many more. Will and Abby take some time to review the latest “Small Axe” film from Steve McQueen on Amazon Prime Video: Lovers Rock. The whole gang joins the fun of The Twentieth Century, Matthew Rankin’s absurdist festival indie that might’ve stolen all our hearts. We also cover our mixed feelings on Alan Ball’s latest film since 2007, Uncle Frank, which boasts strong performances from Paul Bettany, Peter Macdissi, and Sophia Lillis. And last, Jon discusses Zappa, Alex Winter’s eclectic new documentary about the life of the infamous guitarist Frank Zappa.

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Extra Milestone – Raging Bull (1980), One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

Even in the midst of a year as hectic and unconventional as this one, Oscar season is still in full swing when it comes to this week’s selection of heavy hitters. Joining me once again for the first time in nearly three years is Maria Garcia, my former partner in crime from such shows as Now Conspiring and Part-Time Characters, and we’re discussing two films often hailed as being among the greatest of all time! We begin with Raging Bull, the morally complex sports biopic that saved Martin Scorsese’s life and has developed a widely varied legacy, and which one of us isn’t especially fond of! From there, we rewind the clock to visit Miloš Forman’s award season darling One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, a wholly unique classic within film history that holds up wonderfully to this day.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #195 – Run, Mangrove, The Last Vermeer, Collective, The LEGO Star Wars Holiday Special

It’s just Will and Abby on the show this week, so you know what that means. No rules! No Jon to tell us, “No, you can’t review Aneesh Chaganty’s new film Run, his follow-up to Searching.” It doesn’t matter that it stars Sarah Paulson and Kiera Allen in her breakout role, or that the film is now streaming on Hulu. That’s right, Will and Abby are going all out. They’re talking about the best and worst Ron Howard movies. They’re discussing some under-the-radar films you might want to look into, plus a holiday special they break down brick by brick. So until Jon gets back, it’s a momentous — nay classic — Will and Abby shenanicast.

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Extra Milestone – All About Eve (1950), Rebel Without A Cause (1955)

To close out the month of October, we’re reviewing two of the best films of the 1950s, and also trying out a new format for the show! First up is my conversation with Rob Wilkinson on Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s All About Eve, an all-star drama with a record-breaking number of Oscar nominations, and which happens to be a fantastic exploration of the unforgiving theater world. After that, I chat with my Anyway, That’s All I Got cohost Anthony Battaglia about Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without A Cause, a landmark teen drama featuring an indelible posthumous performance by James Dean, and which is also fantastic!

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A Nice Place to Visit – Mr. Denton on Doomsday

We’ve finally hit a dud! The local drunkard in an Old West town receives a surprising visit from fate one day, and what happens next may change his own life – and the lives of others – for good. It’s the third proper episode of The Twilight Zone, it’s one that just doesn’t function at the end of the day, and we’re here to figure out why. Tune in to the Cinemaholics Patreon to hear our analysis of the episode’s various thematic leanings, the reason why this one feels so darn weird compared to the others, how it fits into the greater Twilight Zone lore, and more!

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Extra Milestone – Dances With Wolves (1990), The Magnificent Seven (1960), To Sleep With Anger (1990)

Adonis Gonzalez, my cohost on A Nice Place to Visit and Game Over, Man!, is back on the show to discuss a trio of movies that have nothing to do with each other…or do they? Tune in to hear our conversation on Kevin Costner’s Oscar-Winning epic Dances With Wolves, John Sturges’ iconic western remake The Magnificent Seven, and Charles Burnett’s engrossing family drama To Sleep With Anger!

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‘Wolfwalkers’ Film Review – TIFF 2020

Fables are the fabric through which we weave our hopes, our morals from past failures, and our burning idealism into the consciousness of future generations. In the grand tradition of passing down stories and sharing grand memories to young and impressionable minds, Cartoon Saloon and Mélusine productions’ Wolfwalkers, the new animated movie from directors Tomm Moore (The Secret of Kells, Song of the Sea) and Ross Stewart, is a lovely and winningly sincere 2D tale of friendship, acceptance, and the rapid dangers of societal mistrust.

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Game Over, Man! – Episode 4: Predator 2

Adonis and Sam are back after an unexpected hiatus to continue the Alien/Predator saga with Stephen Hopkins’ sequel to John McTiernan’s introduction to the Predator, Predator 2! It’s a film that has received a mixed reaction over time, and the two of us certainly have some words for this film. Tune in to the Cinemaholics Patreon to hear what we had to say!

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The First Rule of ‘Chick Fight’ – Do Not Talk About ‘Chick Fight’

The success of 2011’s Bridesmaids proved female comedies featuring the kind of bawdy, scattalogical humor typically seen in male-led comedies could lead to box office gold. In its wake came a wave of Bechdel-test-passing, R-rated comedies of varying degrees of success, including the smash hit Girls Trip in 2017. Chick Fight feels like the product of Bridesmaids-effect. The women of Chick Fight don’t give a damn about being “ladylike.” They’re badasses! They’re sexual like Melissa McCarthy in that plane scene! The romance is a side plot! But the movie lacks what set Bridesmaids and Girls Trip apart: authenticity.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #193 – The Dark and the Wicked, The Queen’s Gambit, Let Him Go, Kindred, Come Play, Time

Election week is over, but that doesn’t mean we took a break from catching up on new movies. Our reviews this week include The Dark and the Wicked, a new horror film from Bryan Bertino that is now streaming on demand. We also discuss the new Netflix miniseries The Queen’s Gambit, which stars Anya Taylor-Joy and Marielle Heller. Plus, we cover Let Him Go starring Kevin Costner and Diane Lane, Kindred starring Tamara Lawrance and Fiona Shaw, Come Play starring Gillian Jacobs and Azhy Robertson, and finally Time, Garrett Bradley’s new Amazon Studios documentary that premiered at Sundance 2020.

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Extra Milestone – The Elephant Man (1980), After Hours (1985), Close-Up (1990)

Will Ashton returns to Extra Milestone yet again to chart an unusual cinematic path across the 1980s and 1990s! We begin with an examination of David Lynch’s The Elephant Man, including our thoughts on the story’s emotional core, trivia on why the film is significant to the history of the academy, our impressions of David Lynch, and more! From there, we return to the films of Martin Scorsese with After Hours, an unusual and underseen comedic outing from the acclaimed director, and we close out the show by bringing the films of Abbas Kiarostami into focus with Close-Up, a hybrid documentary exploring the very nature and function of cinema.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #192 – His House, The Craft: Legacy, Holidate, Over the Moon

In this house, we review the new Netflix horror film His House, the feature debut of writer/director Remi Weekes starring Wunmi Mosaku, Sope Dirisu, and Matt Smith. We also discuss the soft reboot/sequel The Craft: Legacy, which is now on VOD. There’s Holidate, an unexpectedly R-rated rom-com on Netflix that might win some hearts. And last, Glen Keane’s feature directorial debut, Over the Moon, an animated family film from the same studio that made last year’s Abominable.

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‘City Hall’ Film Review – TIFF 2020

I’m not exactly sure how to sell you on Frederick Wiseman’s City Hall. This sweeping, sprawling, four-and-a-half-hour documentary is a massive, city-wide examination of the inner workings of Boston’s government and public services. It’s an elaborate, expansive look at what makes a city the way it is, how its citizens and political leaders work hard to keep everything running, and the seemingly endless hurdles that poor and marginalized individuals often need to go through in order to make their voices heard. It’s a bulky, burgeoning enterprise of a documentary that’s as interested in watching town hall officials speak to the masses as it is watching the local garbagemen take out the trash on their regular circuits.

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Extra Milestone – Psycho (1960), Se7en (1995)

Guy Simons Jr. (of Anyway, That’s All I Got fame) joins me for the first time on Extra Milestone for a special Halloween episode devoted to two of the greatest serial killer movies of all time! Kicking off our conversation is Alfred Hitchcock’s game-changing masterpiece Psycho, including the unique and revolutionary distribution of the film, the ways in which it insidiously sets itself apart from every other movie, whether or not it should be considered a ‘slasher,’ and more! After that, we jump forward to David Fincher’s haunting detective thriller Se7en, a movie which one of us had somehow never seen until now! We also discuss the film’s somewhat troubled legacy, the ways in which it has infiltrated the internet consciousness, and even some valuable insight on whether or not it should be viewed as an optimistic film!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #191 – Borat Subsequent Moviefilm, On the Rocks, The Witches, Rebecca, Bad Hair

It time for very nice episode of Cinemaholics. First American movie is Borat Subsequent Moviefilm, great success. Rashida Jones and Bill Murray have weird marriage problem in On the Rocks, not nice. New streaming service HBO Max ruin day with The Witches, my wife Anne Hathaway make big impression. Rebecca on Netflix make no sense, but Lily James in it, high five. Bad Hair on Hulu scare all children, not appropriate for babies under 3, now official favorite movie of Cinemaholics Halloween.

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A Nice Place to Visit – One for the Angels

It’s the second official episode of The Twilight Zone, and it may be one of the best! A traveling salesman (Ed Wynn) is visited by the specter of death (Murray Hamilton), and the two of us have some (many) questions! Tune in to the Cinemaholics Patreon to hear why we connect to this episode so heavily, the ways in which it encapsulates everything that makes the show awesome, and even our incredibly bizarre idea for an entire series that could spin off from this episode!

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Extra Milestone – Goodfellas (1990), Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

Cinemaholics host Jon Negroni returns to Extra Milestone for a double feature of two of the greatest films of all time! We start by discussing Sidney Lumet’s 1975 crime thriller Dog Day Afternoon, a revolutionary and dynamic film that remains just as relevant 45 years later, if not even more so. From there, we move on to Martin Scorsese’s career-defining classic Goodfellas, which we believe may potentially hold the title as the greatest gangster film of them all, in addition to being expertly crafted in every way.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #190 – The Trial of the Chicago 7, Love and Monsters, American Utopia, Spontaneous, The Kid Detective

This week, we call Aaron Sorkin to the stand for his latest film The Trial of the Chicago 7, which is now on Netflix and stars Sacha Baron Cohen, Eddie Redmayne, Mark Rylance, Joseph Gordon Levitt, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, and many more. We also find some time for love, or Love and Monsters to be specific, which stars Dylan O’Brien and Jessica Henwick. We discuss Spike Lee’s concert film, David Byrne’s American Utopia, which is now on HBO Max. Plus Spontaneous, a high school “sci fi black comedy” starring Katherine Langford and Charlie Plummer. And finally, The Kid Detective, a dark comedy starring Adam Brody and Sophie Nélisse.

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‘The Kid Detective’ Review – TIFF 2020

There comes a point in many people’s lives when they realize they’re not going to live up to their past potential. Whatever bright promise they once showed grows dim in the recesses of time, and the gradual steps toward the mediocrity and bitter acceptance of a middling adulthood come heavily. This is not autobiographical; I had little-to-no potential growing up, and I’m certainly not living up to it now! But it’s the tortured and tormented existence of Abe Applebaum, the former child protigee-turned-sad-sack protagonist of writer-director Evan Morgan’s dark noir dramedy The Kid Detective, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival last month before making its unexpected theatrical release (at least, for me) this weekend.

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Game Over, Man! – Episode 3: Predator

We’ve met the Aliens, but the time has come at last to face the Predators. This week on Game Over, Man!, Sam and Adonis are taking their first departure from the Alien series to take a look back at John McTiernan’s sophomore feature Predator! If that weren’t enough, one of the hosts isn’t a fan of the movie, making this our first major disagreement! Tune in to the Cinemaholics Patreon to hear how James Cameron serendipitously influenced the design of the Predator, why the hosts are of two different minds, who they actually think would win if a Predator and a Xenomorph were to face off, and more!

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‘A Babysitter’s Guide to Monster Hunting’ Is The Candy Corn of Halloween Movies

Babysitter’s Guide, directed by Rachel Talalay (Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare), is based on a three-part book of the same name, written and adapted for the screen by Joe Ballarini. The movie takes place in Rhode Island where teen Kelly is a math whiz and social pariah, dubbed “Monster Girl” by her peers who still mock her for claiming to be have been attacked by a monster at age five. On Halloween night, Kelly learns monsters are, in fact, very real when Jacob, the boy she is babysitting, is kidnapped by the boogeyman himself. Kelly is joined by an underground society of monster-hunting babysitters to rescue Jacob and stop the boogeyman from releasing his army of nightmares on the world.

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Extra Milestone – Sunset Boulevard (1950), The Gold Rush (1925)

Emily Kubincanek returns to Extra Milestone at last, and in no small fashion! We’re diving headfirst into the most Classic of Cinema with two brilliant films that connect to the Silent Era! First up is Charlie Chaplin’s The Gold Rush, a dramatic comedy featuring Chaplin’s ‘Little Tramp’ that cemented many dramatic traditions while simultaneously telling a heartfelt and humorous story! From there, we jump forward to Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard, which examines the world of showbusiness, the remnants of the Silent Era, and the widespread sacrifices found in Hollywood living through a melancholy lens steeped in Film Noir tradition.

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A Nice Place to Visit – Where is Everybody?

A man with no memory of his identity wakes up near a small town that’s completely abandoned…or is it? It’s the very first *actual* episode of The Twilight Zone, and we’re joined by our longtime friend and podcast collaborator Bridget Serdock to discuss it! Is it an effective introduction to the series at large? How does this unusual scenario tap into universal anxieties? Does it actually make scientific sense once the twist is revealed? And what would we do with an entire town to ourselves? Find out in the dimension which we call: A Nice Place to Visit.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #189 – Hubie Halloween, The Wolf of Snow Hollow, The 40-Year-Old Version, Charm City Kings, The Lie

It’s a little spooky how positive we are on Hubie Halloween, the newest Netflix film starring Adam Sandler and a whole host of other recognizable actors and comedians. We keep the horror comedy vibe going with our review of The Wolf of Snow Hollow, the final film starring Robert Forster. Then we go back to Netflix to watch The 40-Year-Old Version, a Sundance hit starring Radha Blank, who also directed the film. On HBO Max, there’s Charm City Kings, a fun dirt bike racing drama starring Jahi Di’Allo Winston and Meek Mill. And finally, Will welcomes us to “Welcome to the Blumhouse,” a new Amazon Prime Video slate of horror movies starting with The Lie.

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Extra Milestone – Rashomon (1950), The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)

The pairings keep getting stranger and stranger every week, and this week’s show is no exception! Special guest Ryan Oliver joins Sam and Jon to tackle two very different classics, starting with Akira Kurosawa’s massively influential 1950 arthouse classic Rashomon. We discuss everything from our differing experiences with the film, how multiple viewings have yielded different interpretations, and why the film has remained so meaningful even after 70 years. After that, we take a huge left turn toward Transylvania to examine the legacy and power of Jim Sharman’s 1975 genre-defining cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show, which one of us doesn’t like! It’s another collection of varied experiences complete with a litany of recommendations to go along with both films!

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‘I Am Greta’ Film Review – TIFF 2020

By now, you’re likely familiar with Greta Thunberg, a 17-year-old Swedish environmental activist who’s drummed up heaps of international press over her ongoing efforts to bring serious awareness to the increasing dangers of climate change, global warming, and the depletion of our global resources. It’s a problem impacting all of us, young and old. In fact, it’s the youth in particular who will need to live with the consequences of their elders if we don’t do something to prevent the aching calls of distress from our dying planet. It’s been noted several times by now that we’re currently at the brink of irreversible damage, and if something isn’t done imminently, we’ll suffer greatly from the extreme consequences of our inaction.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #188 – Possessor, Dick Johnson is Dead, Scare Me, Save Yourselves!

We had an out-of-body experience trying to review Brandon Cronenberg’s trippy new sci-fi horror film Possessor, which stars Andrea Riseborough, Christopher Abbot, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and Sean Bean. After that, we dive into the endless charms of Kirsten Johnson’s new documentary Dick Johnson is Dead. And since it is October, why not add another horror film, Scare Me, which is now on Shudder. Last, there’s Save Yourselves! — a new indie comedy starring Sunita Mani and John Paul Reynolds.

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Game Over, Man! – Episode 2: Aliens

In our first Patron-Exclusive podcast, we’re continuing the Alien franchise with James Cameron’s Aliens, the pluralized sequel that shook the world! Sigourney Weaver returns as Ellen Ripley in an Oscar-nominated role that pits her, a team of memorable space marines, and a young orphaned girl against an entire hive of deadly Xenomorphs, and it’s even better than the original! Tune in on the Cinemaholics Patreon to hear us discuss the brilliant character interactions, effective and efficiently-produced scares, and even the deeper implications on the potential of humanity!

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Extra Milestone – Wanda (1970), Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985), Vagabond (1985)

To officially commence the Milestone month of August, Will Ashton and Andrew McMahon make their long-awaited returns to help break down a unique and unexpected triple feature, the likes of which the podcast world may have never seen before. We begin with an analysis of Barbara Loden’s Wanda, the first film to be written, directed, and led by a female filmmaker. We follow this up with a look back at Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, the iconic feature debut of Tim Burton. Finally, we dive into the work of the great Agnès Varda with an observational look at her acclaimed and influential film Vagabond.

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An All-Star, All-Gay Cast Shines in Netflix’s Razor Sharp ‘The Boys in the Band’

Matt Crowley’s play The Boys in the Band shocked mainstream audiences when it opened Off Broadway in 1968. It tells the story of seven gay men at a birthday party in a New York City apartment, which was groundbreaking at the time in how it pioneered representation of gay life. Now, the story is being brought to life once again in a new movie from Netflix and a team of producers that includes Ryan Murphy — as part of his $300 million deal with the streaming service.

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‘The Babysitter: Killer Queen’ Just Proved Why This Series Has A Cult Following

The Babysitter: Killer Queen, directed by McG and starring pretty much the exact same cast as the first film, was released exclusively on Netflix earlier this month and is described by the service as a “teen comedy horror…sequel.” Thanks to the sequel’s release, the original went from a cult-favorite film to the first in a cult-favorite franchise. Much like the majority of its cast and crew, The Babysitter: Killer Queen is more of the same kind of material we got from the first movie. Yet, for whatever reason, I enjoyed this one a lot more.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #187 – Enola Holmes, Kajillionaire, Secret Society of Second Born Royals

As always, we don’t have a clue what to review this week. But we’ll start with Enola Holmes, a new YA Netflix film starring Millie Bobby Brown as the younger sister of Sherlock Holmes, played by Henry Cavill. We also discuss Miranda July’s latest indie favorite, Kajillionaire, which stars Evan Rachel Wood, Gina Rodriguez, Richard Jenkins, and Debra Winger. Last, there’s a new Disney+ movie made with the Disney Channel called Secret Society of Second Born Royals and, um, yikes.

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‘Apples’ Film Review – TIFF 2020

Apples, the feature directorial debut of Christos Nikou, isn’t a horror film, though it does grapple with something that’s terrifying to think about. In the midst of a nationwide pandemic, where people instantly and inexplicably suffer from acute cases of severe amnesia, Number 14842, a.k.a. Aris (Aris Servetalis), is the latest patient who winds up in the Disturbed Memory Department, a mental rehabilitation center for people who cannot remember their identities, their past, their loved ones, or where they live.

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A Nice Place to Visit – The Time Element

Welcome to the very first episode of A NICE PLACE TO VISIT, the *other* Patreon exclusive podcast hosted by Adonis Gonzalez and Sam Noland! This is the show where we’re going to be reviewing every episode of The Twilight Zone, and to kick things off we’re talking about…a different show entirely?! Before Rod Serling’s vision officially came to fruition in 1959, the show’s concept was introduced in a 1958 episode of the anthology series Westinghouse Desilu Playhouse, and was introduced by none other than the great Desi Arnaz! Starring William Bendix and Martin Balsam, The Time Element tells the story of a man haunted by a recurring dream that may be more supernatural than anyone thinks. Does this episode properly establish the tone of The Twilight Zone? Does it even make sense in spite of that? What recurring dreams have Adonis and Sam had? And how would we react to traveling through time? Find out in the dimension which we call: A NICE PLACE TO VISIT.

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‘Good Joe Bell’ Review – TIFF 2020

I want to believe that most movies are made with good intentions. I have a hard time believing that a group of people would spend a year (or more) of their time working on something for shallow or potentially even cynical reasons. Yes, we live in a very cynical world, as Jerry Maguire once said. I understand that people are not always driven by pure desires and good deeds. But when it comes to art, especially art that is meant to be as emotionally engrossing as Good Joe Bell, the newest film from director Reinaldo Marcus Green (Monsters and Men), I would believe — or, at least, hope — that the motivations behind this project were noble and good, as its dutiful title would suggest. Nevertheless, movies don’t give out prizes for good intentions.

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Extra Milestone – Come and See (1985), Back to the Future (1985)

Things are getting real heavy this week, because Adonis Gonzalez is here to talk about the two best movies of 1985, which happen to be radically different from one another! We start with a harrowing exploration of Elem Klimov’s Come and See, an anti-war film depicting the Nazi invasion of Belorussia through the eyes of a young boy. We discuss the history of the film’s reputation, the drama associated with the production, the way that it emerges as (potentially) the only War movie that actually matters, and why we find it so difficult to even recommend. After that, we were happy to cleanse our palate with a discussion on Robert Zemeckis’s iconic Sci-Fi Family Comedy Back to the Future, covering its deft narrative construction, effective antagonist, and curious soundtrack decisions, as well as a deserved commendation for the recently deceased Ron Cobb.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – TIFF 2020 Recap

This year’s Toronto International Film Festival has just ended, but we’re just getting started covering and even rediscovering the best and worst of this virtual event. From awards favorites like Nomadland and One Night in Miami to noteworthy standouts like Wolfwalkers and City Hall, we discuss up to 33 films you’ll likely hear even more about as we move into the winter film season.

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‘Enola Holmes’ Gives Netflix a Welcome New Addition to the Sherlock Canon

Enola Holmes is based on the YA book series The Enola Holmes Mysteries by Nancy Springer. It tells the story of Enola Holmes, the younger sister of Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes, the former of whom is already famous by the time our story starts in 1884. After her father dies and her brothers leave home, Enola is left with her beloved but eccentric mother, Eudoria, at the family’s country estate. Then, on the morning of Enola’s sixteenth birthday, Eudoria disappears. Enola must follow her trail of clues and set out on an adventure to find her. The plot thickens when she meets Viscount Tewksbury, a runaway Marquess pursued by a mysterious assassin in a bowler hat. The game is afoot.

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‘The Nest’ Proves that Real Life Can Be Just as Scary as a Horror Movie

Directed and written by Sean Durkin in his latest film since 2011, The Nest tells the story of Rory O’Hara, portrayed by Jude Law, who after a seemingly successful life of entrepreneurism in the States, moves back to London in the late 1980s so he can work for his old company. Along with his loving wife Allison (Carrie Coon) and their children Samantha and Ben (Oona Roche and Charlie Shotwell), the family moves into a luxurious, countryside house, and as this summary might hint, things begin to take a “twisted turn” once they arrive.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #186 – The Devil All The Time, The Nest, Antebellum, The Way I See It

On this week’s episode, we’re hitchhiking all the way to West Virginia and Ohio for the latest Netflix original film, The Devil All The Time starring Tom Holland and Robert Pattinson. We also discuss The Nest starring Jude Law and Carrie Coon, Antebellum starring Janelle Monáe, and The Way I See It, a new documentary about the Obama administration from the perspective of his official White House photographer.

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Game Over, Man! – Episode 1: Alien

Welcome to the very first episode of a new limited podcast series hosted by Sam Noland and Adonis Gonzalez! The two of them have decided to celebrate the spookiest time of year by reviewing every Alien and Predator movie, and they’re starting at the very beginning with none other than Ridley Scott’s landmark 1979 Sci-Fi Horror Classic Alien. Tune in to hear them discuss their experience and familiarity with the film, why it still easily lives up to the hype, behind-the-scenes information, and even a fun scenario on how they would introduce someone to the film for the first time! Give it a listen, and then be sure to sign up for the Cinemaholics Patreon, where the remainder of the episodes will be exclusively available.

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‘The Water Man’ Film Review – TIFF 2020

In theory, there’s something quite lovely about David Oyelowo’s directorial debut, The Water Man. It’s a celebration of the power of storytelling and the ways in which we can use our imaginations to understand the intricacies of our realities. The execution is completely earnest and sometimes charming, particularly with a strong lead performance from newcomer Lonnie Chavis. The storybook quality, while not especially novel, certainly makes it an accessible film for young audiences, even when it deals with heavy subject matter. Despite its warm presentation, likable sincerity, and all its good intentions, there’s also a cold irony to how familiar and rudimentary it can be in its narrative structure.

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Extra Milestone – The Night of the Hunter (1955), Airplane! (1980)

Sam Noland is back on Extra Milestone after a week’s respite to take on, along with friend and coworker Robert Wilkinson, two radically different classics. First up is Charles Laughton’s gothic thriller The Night of the Hunter, which stars Robert Mitchum as a psychopathic priest hunting down two children during the Great Depression. Next up on our itinerary is the landmark spoof comedy Airplane!, the laugh-a-minute lampooning of pop cinema celebrating 40 years of making the world howl with laughter.

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‘Falling’ Movie Review – TIFF 2020

Viggo Mortensen makes his screenwriting and directorial debut with Falling, a heavy (and sometimes heavy-handed) family drama in which Mortensen also stars as John, a mild-mannered pilot who takes a week off from work in order to spend time with his critical, outspoken, set-in-his-ways father (Lance Henriksen), a brittle senior who is never afraid to yell, demean, and belittle anyone and everyone around him. John and his family, including his husband (Terry Chen), his adopted daughter (Gabby Velis), and his sister (Laura Linney), all try their best to put up with the old man’s endless torments. After all, it’s not looking good for his future. He’s a relic of the past who haunts his family — even as he’s still among the living (if only for so long). His disgruntled children do everything they can to keep their decades-spanning feelings of anguish, remorse, and frustration toward their father to themselves, but Mortensen’s moody movie is unafraid to turn up the dial until it’s almost unbearable for anyone (them or us) to want to spend even a minute longer in this man’s narrow-minded company.

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‘Enemies Of The State’ Film Review – TIFF 2020

Enemies of the State, from director Sonia Kennebeck (National Bird), doesn’t need to do too much to make audiences feel an unnerving sense of dread over the dangers of government surveillance in our current technological era. We, the people, are growing ever more aware of the uncovered truths in an age of Wikileaks and other online methods of taking off masks and discovering previously undisclosed secrets. But ironically enough, in an age where information can often be at the click of the button, what is actually true and what is being constructed by our government can become foggy in an age of post-truth and “fake news.” Are we sometimes too quick to assume what is true and what is fabricated? Are government figures merely looking out for their own interests, or do they have more specific agendas? At a time where we know more about the activities of the U.S. government than ever, we might have even more questions than ever regarding their activities and what they seek to find in American homes.

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‘The Devil All the Time’ Explores Religious Violence and Generational Sin In Small-Town America

Director Antonio Campos wastes no time setting the tone of The Devil All the Time, his adaptation of the 2011 novel by Donald Ray Pollack. Within the first few minutes, Willard Russell (Bill Skarsgård), an American soldier in the South Pacific during World War II, finds the fly-ridden body of a marine crucified on a cross. The scene is the first of many bloody acts in the bleak film, and the theme of violence and sacrifice is explored even further throughout its 139 minutes.

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‘The Way I See It’ Tells a New Story about the Obama White House—From the Perspective of its Photographer

No matter their political persuasion, most people can probably agree that there is a stark difference between the Obama presidency and the current one. Because this is an election year, we’ve been inundated with a seemingly endless stream of new documentaries reminding us of this fact and expanding upon various calls to action leaning one way or the other on who should run the country for the next four years. Perhaps the most unconventional of these recent docs is The Way I See It from director Dawn Porter, which showcases archived stills taken by President Obama’s White House photographer, Pete Souza, who also worked for the Reagan administration.

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‘Holler’ Film Review – TIFF 2020

When I started Holler, the first feature film written and directed by Nicole Riegel and based on her short film of the same name, I had this ringing feeling. Its sense of place, warm authenticity, and bittersweet emotional core were all burning bright just as this homey small-town indie began. Aided by a bristling, genuine lead performance from Jessica Barden (The Lobster, The End of the F****** World), I was already feeling energized and enthusiastic about the wondrous possibility that I might be watching one of the finest debuts of this year’s highly unorthodox Toronto International Film Festival.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #185 – Unpregnant, The Social Dilemma, Cuties, #Alive, All In: The Fight For Democracy

The Cinemaholics are going on a road trip! Metaphorically, at least. Our first pit stop this week is an in-depth review of Unpregnant, a buddy road trip comedy streaming exclusively on HBO Max, and it stars Haley Lu Richardson and Barbie Ferreira. Next, we travel all the way to the internet for The Social Dilemma, a new Netflix documentary about how social media is basically ruining society. Fun! After that, we head to France to discuss yet another Netflix film, Cuties, which has been caught in a maelstrom of controversy considering its sexual content. But that’s not all, we go on a detour out east for #Alive, a new South Korean zombie movie on (you guessed it) Netflix! Last, we head on home for an American documentary on Prime Video called All In: The Fight For Democracy, which is about voter suppression in these United States.

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The New Retro-Indie Thriller ‘Rent-A-Pal’ Might Just Be Worth-A-Rent

When it comes to psychological horror, there is one unwritten but common and maybe even obvious imperative: you have to mess with your audience’s mind. The true horror doesn’t come from a man in a papier-mâché Halloween mask or a creepy-crawly creature from the fifth dimension like you’ll see in other scary movies. It comes from mystery, the feeling that you never have any idea what is actually going on in the film you’re watching, as well as the sense of dread that confusion might entail. So I guess you could say Rent-A-Pal is a pretty good psychological horror — one certainly deserving the genre label.

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Extra Milestone – The Apartment (1960)

Hey there, buddy-boys and buddy-gals! This week, we might just have the key to your next favorite movie, The Apartment, which recently celebrated 60 years since its initial release. Widely considered to be one of Billy Wilder’s true masterpieces, this romantic dramedy stars Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, and Fred McMurray. We discuss the film’s impact on our own movie-going lives, play some of our favorite clips, and have a spirited debate about this either being a “Christmas movie” or a “New Year’s” movie.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #184 – Mulan, I’m Thinking of Ending Things

In our first official episode with new Cinemaholics co-host Abby Olcese, we discuss the honor and honor that is to be found honorable in Mulan, the latest live-action Disney remake, which stars Liu Yifei, Donnie Yen, Tzi Ma, Gong Li, and Jet Li. Plus, we review Charlie Kaufman’s new mind-bending film I’m Thinking of Ending Things, which is now on Netflix and stars Jessie Buckley, Jesse Plemons, Toni Collette, and David Thewlis.

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‘Mr. Soul’ is a Documentary that Shouldn’t Be Ignored, Just Like the Man it’s Based on

If you search the name “Ellis Haizlip” in your preferred search engine of choice today, you won’t get a lot of results. There is no Wikipedia page, and his IMDB spotlight is slim, to say the least. Most of what you’ll get are stories and reviews about Mr. Soul, the documentary detailing the life and career of Haizlip and his time as the producer and host of “Soul!” from 1968 to 1973. A documentary, I might add, that most people wouldn’t even know to search the name of because much like the person it’s analyzing, it wasn’t massively advertised. Still, Mr. Soul is just as important to American life and TV as the man himself was.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Tenet

In this special bonus episode, guests Cory Woodroof and Charlie Ridgely join Will Ashton for an in-depth review of Tenet, the newest film from director Christopher Nolan.

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Extra Milestone – Jaws (1975), The Empire Strikes Back (1980)

This week’s Extra Milestone is so iconic that we may just need a bigger boat. Anthony Battaglia reunites with Sam to discuss two immensely significant blockbusters that have irreparably shaped the cinematic landscape. We start with a discussion on Steven Spielberg’s Jaws, including our differing experiences with the movie, our appreciation for the writing and acting, differences from Peter Benchley’s novel, a confession as to our shared fear of open water, and even an extremely hot take involving the infamous sequels! After we dry off from that conversation, we take an isolated look at Irvin Kershner’s The Empire Strikes Back and how it changed Star Wars (and sequels in general) forever, why it maintains its effectiveness after dozens of viewings, why we can never view the Dagobah sequence the same way again, whether or not it contains the best lightsaber battle ever, and the dichotomy between good and evil that was solidified in this film.

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Disney Re-spins ‘Mulan’ into a Proto-Fantasy Epic, But is it a Film Worth Paying Extra For?

As a business model, Disney’s years-long effort to re-capitalize its most iconic animated films of yesteryear into big-budget, live-action (or live-action-esque in the case of last year’s The Lion King) reimaginings has been nothing short of a financial masterstroke, not too far below the juggernaut success of their Marvel and Star Wars acquisitions just a decade ago. In some ways, Mulan represents both the highs and lows of Disney’s trip down memory lane, from family favorites like The Jungle Book to more critically shrugged replicants like Beauty and the Beast. Either way, Mulan is sure to leave some audiences clamoring for more, while others might end up feeling somewhat cheated by what could’ve been.

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Netflix’s ‘Love, Guaranteed’ Follows the Rom-Com Algorithm, But You Might Still Swipe Right

She’s a litigator who spends her days in court defending the little man pro bono and her nights alone with nothing but Chinese takeout for comfort. He’s handsome, wealthy, and charming but totally incapable of falling in love — or so it seems. It’s the perfect setup. By the time the title card appears, accompanied by Tiffany’s 80s pop anthem “I Think We’re Alone Now,” Netflix’s Love, Guaranteed has laid out all the standard rules for the romantic comedy. The next 90 minutes won’t do much to challenge those rules, but it’s a fun 90 minutes nonetheless.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #183 – The New Mutants, Bill & Ted Face the Music, The Personal History of David Copperfield

Special guest Charlie Ridgely joins the show for our long-awaited review of The New Mutants, the final X-Men comic-book movie made by Fox…which was shot three years ago. We also discuss Bill & Ted Face the Music, the third installment in the beloved franchise starring Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter. And last we tackle The Personal History of David Copperfield, a new adaptation of the classic Charles Dickens novel, and this one stars Dev Patel and was directed by Armando Iannucci.

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Chadwick Boseman: Black Panther On Screen, Superman in Life

On August 28, 2020, the world stood still. As I sat in a diner, patiently awaiting my “breakfast for dinner,” I did what every person nowadays does when there’s nothing else to do: I checked my phone. The first thing I saw when I opened Twitter and looked at my timeline was the most shocking and heartbreaking news I never knew I wasn’t prepared to hear. Chadwick Boseman, star of Black Panther, was dead at 43. Boseman passed away peacefully, surrounded by his wife and family, according to the statement made on his official Twitter account. I sat there in shock and disbelief, hoping and praying that this might be some sort of joke. That maybe his account had been hacked, or I was stuck in some sort of lucid dream. It didn’t take long for the swarms of tweets and replies full of the same amount of disbelief to come in, as well as the responses from those who knew him or wished to know him more. Then I realized it was real.

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‘The Personal History Of David Copperfield’ is a Fun, but Flimsy, Dickens Adaptation

I’ll never claim to be a great source of knowledge when it comes to the works of Charles Dickens. My familiarity with his words derive through other sources, mainly various adaptations of varying faithfulness or stylistic-to-bombastic re-imaginings of his material that may or may not honor the “spirit” of his original scribbles. Therefore, I cannot tell you whether or not The Personal History of David Copperfield is a fitting adaptation, nor if it properly honors Dickens’ long-standing legacy and cultural relevance. But here’s what I can tell you.

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The Paralympians of ‘Rising Phoenix’ Will Challenge Your Perception of Disability

The new Netflix documentary Rising Phoenix, directed by Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui, reflects on the history and impact of the Paralympic Games while telling the stories of several of its elite athletes. The first lines of the documentary draw a parallel between Marvel’s Avengers and Paralympians. Like comic book superheroes, each of the featured competitors has an origin story; a tale of facing obstacles, beating the odds, and unlocking great strength. As an introductory voiceover puts it, “The Olympics are where heroes are created. The Paralympics are where heroes come.”

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Extra Milestone – The Shining (1980), Gremlins (1984), Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990)

It’s all play and no work on this week’s Extra Milestone, because Jason Read has returned to the show to discuss a trio of very different movies. We begin with a detailed exploration of Stanley Kubrick’s Horror masterpiece The Shining, complete with reflections on why the terror of it is so effective, analyses of the movie’s themes and mysteries, a discussion of why method acting is a flawed and unnecessary process, and even a few personal stories that relate to the movie. Afterward, we take on Joe Dante’s Gremlins, stopping along the way to discuss its implementation of cinematic language, its historical significance, and all of the darkly comedic chaos that comes with it. Finally, we cap off the show with a fittingly sporadic look at Dante’s oft-overlooked sequel Gremlins 2: The New Batch, which is one of the most entertaining movies either of us have ever seen, as well as being a knowing satire of culture stuffed with enough cameos and mania to last a lifetime.

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Video Review – The Boys Season 2

Wait, video review? For a TV show? I thought this was a Cinema podcast! For all the holics out there! Well, dear listener, guess what. “The Boys” Season 2 is about to hit Amazon Prime Video, and I recorded a video review on our YouTube Channel. Youtube Channel?! That’s right, we have a YouTube Channel. Been a thing for a minute.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #182 – The One and Only Ivan, Tesla, Words on Bathroom Walls

The two and only Cinemaholics are back to review The One and Only Ivan, a new Disney+ family feature starring Bryan Cranston, Sam Rockwell, Danny DeVito, Angelina Jolie, and many more. We also go back in time in a fun way with our discussion of Tesla, the Sundance biopic from IFC Films starring Ethan Hawke. And we finish the show with a review of Words on Bathroom Walls, the new YA teen romance starring Charlie Plummer and Taylor Russell.

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‘Tesla’ is a Shockingly Tame Biopic with Sparks of Hope

Tesla stars Ethan Hawke as the titular inventor who navigates life in the 1800s, one of America’s most “brainstormy” times. Around him are a handful of equally inventive and enigmatic characters, such as Anne Morgan, portrayed by Eve Hewson, and George Westinghouse, portrayed by Jim Gaffigan. And of course, you can’t have a Tesla movie without his famous frenemy and rival in the electricity circuit, Thomas Edison; a role that is perfectly performed by Kyle MacLachlan in small doses. Edison isn’t in the film a whole lot, but he manages to steal the show in a manner accurate to how his real-life inspiration repeatedly stole Tesla’s thunder.

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Extra Milestone – Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), The Blues Brothers (1980)

In what is certainly the most comedically inclined Extra Milestone yet, I am joined by my very close personal friend Tyler Chambers to discuss a pair of classics within the genre. We begin with a lengthy rundown of Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam’s 1975 cult favorite Monty Python and the Holy Grail, complete with behind-the-scenes stories, details we’ve noticed over the years, our personal experiences with the movie, analyses of the film’s comedic stylings, and revisits of our favorite sequences. Then we move on to John Landis’s 1980 musical road comedy The Blues Brothers. We discuss the film’s story structure, cast, presentation, and deadpan sense of humor, as well as how all of those things compare and contrast surprisingly well with Holy Grail. Afterward, we both give a recommendation to pair with each movie, some much more unexpected than others!

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‘Words on Bathroom Walls’ Gives Schizophrenia the YA Teen Drama Treatment

It wasn’t too long ago that young adult coming-of-age movies started to multiply in number upon the box office success of The Fault in Our Stars, which injected the usual teen drama formula with a high-stakes catch. What if you fell in love with someone who has terminal cancer?

This film trend has slowed down somewhat, with the exception of sappy imitators like last year’s Five Feet Apart, and now Words on Bathroom Walls, which rests its central premise on a new question for the genre: what if you fell in love with someone who has schizophrenia?

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In ‘Sputnik,’ the Alien Horror Movie Reviews You

Personally, I believe the horror genre doesn’t get nearly enough credit these days. I’ve struggled to figure out just why that is. Perhaps it’s because of the over-saturation of the genre, the fact that there are quite literally hundreds of films to choose from, many of them admittedly not exactly something to write home about. Maybe it’s because even when horror was at its peak, when the big monsters like Dracula or Jason Voorhees spooked audiences during the Halloween season, horror was advertised as something of a niche genre; meant only for those who could truly appreciate the shock, schlock, and gore of a scary movie. Or maybe it’s because no on-screen jump scare could ever compare to the horrors of reality that many of us have to live through on a daily basis. Either way, the horror genre is pretty underappreciated and often times overlooked when awards season comes around.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #181 – Project Power, Boys State, Magic Camp, Happy Happy Joy Joy

Good news, we don’t need a superpower pill to put on a powerful episode of Cinemaholics, which this week covers Project Power, now on Netflix and starring Jamie Foxx, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, and Dominique Fishback. We also discuss Boys State from A24, a documentary about Texas students who learn about politics by building a government of their own, which is now streaming on Apple TV+. Will describes the less magical elements of Magic Camp, a family comedy that just hit Disney+ starring Adam DeVine and Gillian Jacobs. And last, we have a heated debate about the controversial documentary Happy Happy Joy Joy, which is about the making of Nickelodeon’s pioneering ’90s cartoon “Ren and Stimpy” and the complicated legacy of its problematic show runner.

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Extra Milestone – La Dolce Vita (1960)

Jon Negroni makes his long-awaited return to Extra Milestone to investigate Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, one of his very favorite films. For 60 years, the film has gained a reputation of being one of the most insightful and layered journeys of World Cinema, and I had a wonderful time learning about its many rich cinematic attributes from Jon. Tune in to hear the two of us break down the film’s cinematography, the way it uses the city of Rome to help tell its story, the many exciting chapters that comprise the plot, and more!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #180 – An American Pickle, The Tax Collector, Waiting for the Barbarians

We’ve gotten ourselves into yet another…fermented cucumber. This week we’re reviewing An American Pickle, the new Seth Rogen comedy now streaming on HBO Max. We also discuss David Ayer’s latest directorial/screenwriting effort The Tax Collector, which stars Bobby Soto and Shia LaBeouf. And last is Ciro Guerra’s Waiting for the Barbarians, a slow burn frontier drama starring Mark Rylance, Robert Pattinson, and Johnny Depp. Of course, we open up the episode with a brief, but satisfying check-in with Christopher Nolan, himself.

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Extra Milestone – Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975)

Settle in, listeners, because Julia Teti is back for this week’s Extra Milestone, and it’s for an undertaking of very subtle, methodical proportions. Julia and I have decided to touch on the most famous work of the late, great Chantal Akerman with her three-hour 1975 art house classic Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai Du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles. Celebrating 45 years this past May, the film has been revered by nearly all who have seen it, and continues to signify a wholly unique exploration of a day-to-day life seldom seen to this extent in cinema. With a legacy almost as impressive as its title and runtime, the two of us had plenty to say about this monolithic milestone that continues to have a tremendous impact today.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #179 – She Dies Tomorrow, Black is King, Host, The Fight

The Cinemaholics gang is finally getting existential. Our featured review this week is She Dies Tomorrow, a new indie horror from Amy Seimetz. We also discuss Beyoncé’s Disney+ visual album Black is King, which sort of ties into last year’s The Lion King remake. Also, Host is a new horror film shot and produced during the pandemic, and it’s about a Zoom call that goes horribly wrong. Fun! And last is a new political documentary called The Fight, which is about recent ACLU cases fighting various human rights cases in the United States. We also talk briefly about “Umbrella Academy” Season 2, the future of Netflix sitcoms without “Friends” or “The Office,” and the latest release date news for Tenet.

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Extra Milestone – Friday the 13th (1980), Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Re-Animator (1985)

The summer is about to conclude with a creeping, atmospheric, gory bang, because Emily Kubincanek is back on The Extra Milestone to discuss a trio of Horror Classics! We start with a look at Sean S. Cunningham’s iconic slasher Friday the 13th, and how it sets itself apart from other such films, as well as the excitement of it all that still plays today. We continue with a discussion of James Whale’s sequel Bride of Frankenstein, including the similarities to Mary Shelley’s novel and how Universal crafted a new narrative around the characters. Finally, we dive into the hellish effects showcase that is the late Stuart Gordon’s Re-Animator!

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Extra Milestone – All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

Hold on to your helmets, listeners, because the illustrious Julia Teti is back on the Cinemaholics feed! And not a moment too soon, because the two of us are joined by the scintillating Will Ashton to make Extra Milestone history by tackling our second Best Picture Winner, our second 1930s Film, and our first War (and Anti-War) Film with Lewis Milestone’s All Quiet on the Western Front! Celebrating 90 years this past April, the film has built a deserved legacy of being one of the most effective condemnations of combat and warfare in cinema history, and the three of us have plenty to say to support that. The film’s storied production, its unique and controversial release, its eternal relevancy, and much more are discussed, and we even take the time to recommend some complimentary films! You’re not gonna want to miss this one.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #177 – Relic

No Tenet? No problem. In addition to our featured review this week, we briefly discuss the new streaming service Peacock, including its flagship original series “Brave New World,” which boasts an impressive cast. Plus, Will shares his thoughts on the recently released indie The Sunlit Night, which stars Jenny Slate. Finally, we get into an in-depth discussion of Relic, an Australian horror film starring Emily Mortimer, Robyn Nevin, and Bella Heathcote.

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Extra Milestone – The Passenger (1975), Peeping Tom (1960)

In what will likely go down as the nerdiest and most esoteric Extra Milestone yet, I am joined by my good friend and fellow hardcore cinephile Andrew McMahon to discuss a pair of significant, influential, and all-around great films. We begin with a lengthy discussion of Michelangelo Antonioni’s reflective 1975 thriller The Passenger, in addition to Antonioni’s career as a whole that we’re familiar with, followed by a look at Michael Powell’s career-ending 1960 horror film Peeping Tom. We get into a lot of exciting history and interconnectivity to the greater cinematic art form over the course of both conversations, and we hope it’s just as fun to listen to as it was to record.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #176 – The Old Guard, Palm Springs, Greyhound, First Cow, Family Romance LLC, Sometimes Always Never

Special guest Emily Kubincanek joins us for a marathon of reviews this week, starting with the new Netflix action blockbuster, The Old Guard, starring Charlize Theron and KiKi Layne. Then we loop into Hulu’s time-bending rom-com Palm Springs, starring Andy Samberg and Cristin Milioti. Tom Hanks writes and stars in the new Apple TV+ WWII epic, Greyhound, which just released this week. We slow things down for the meditative First Cow from writer/director Kelly Reichardt. Oh, and Werner Herzog made a new Japanese-language film called Family Romance, LLC. Last, we finish things off with a wordy scramble of a review for the British quirk-film Sometimes Always Never, which stars Bill Nighy and Sam Riley.

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Extra Milestone – The Grapes of Wrath (1940), Terror of MechaGodzilla (1975), How to Train Your Dragon (2010)

Promises are being fulfilled left and right on this week’s Extra Milestone, in which the long-awaited debut of podcast veteran Adonis Gonzalez finally takes place! Adonis and I have a trio of dramatically contrasting movies to discuss, starting with a lengthy exploration of John Ford’s depression-era adaptation of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. We continue with a discussion of Ishirō Honda’s character-defining Kaijū film (as well as Godzilla’s Shōwa Era as a whole) with Terror of MechaGodzilla, and we conclude with a celebration of the 10-year anniversary of Dreamworks’s How to Train Your Dragon. It was great to podcast with Adonis once more, and we hope to unite even more in the future. Enjoy!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #175 – Hamilton

In this episode about Hamilton, the live-recording of the hit broadway musical starring the original cast (Lin-Manuel Miranda, Leslie Odom Jr., Daveed Diggs, and many more) now streaming on Disney+, Jon raps.

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Extra Milestone – Rebecca (1940), Le Trou (1960)

Special guest Emily Kubincanek joins us for a double milestone feature of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca, which just celebrated 80 years since its release, as well as Jacques Becker’s final film Le Trou (or The Hole), which recently had its 60th anniversary. As always, we lay out the context for what makes these films so memorable all these years later, plus there’s a little contention between the Cinemaholics on both films, so stay tuned to hear where we all land.

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Jon Stewart’s ‘Irresistible’ is Inherently Flawed, but it Shouldn’t be Rejected

When it was announced that Jon Stewart would return with his sophomore feature film, since titled Irresistible, it made sense that folks assumed it would be the scathing satire that would criticize and bring damnation to the hotheaded personalities who take rotating chairs in the Big House. But Stewart’s new movie, his first directorial effort since 2014’s overlooked Rosewater, may not be what some folks expect. Indeed, this is not a takedown of the narcissistic, hypocritical right. Stewart isn’t here to put some right-leaning personalities into their place.

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Extra Milestone – Breathless (1960), Eyes Without A Face (1960), Deep Red (1975)

In what will go down as the very first triple header in Extra Milestone history, I am joined once again by Anyway, That’s All I Got veteran Jason Read! Jason and I take a look at both the French New Wave and the work of Jean-Luc Godard with Breathless (1960), explore a fantastic and somewhat lesser-known horror classic with Eyes Without A Face (1960), and round out the show with an exploration of the Giallo subgenre and the work of Dario Argento with the fiendishly frightening Deep Red (1975). Although we went heavily into detail with Breathless, we took special care not to give too much away about the latter two films, so feel free to listen to those segments whether they are old favorites or completely new to you. It’s a delightful series of conversations that traverses a broad section of the cinematic landscape, and we hope it’s just as fun to listen to as it was to record!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #173 – Miss Juneteenth, 7500, Wasp Network, Infamous

This week, we’re kicking the show off with a brief conversation about The Last of Us Part II, plus some listener feedback about political ideologies informing our film reviews. Then we kick off the week’s new releases with Miss Juneteenth, a recent Sundance family drama starring Nicole Beharie. We also fasten our seatbelts for a review of 7500, a claustrophobic hijacking thriller starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt in his first film role since 2016. Will shares his thoughts on the new Netflix spy thriller Wasp Network, which has a huge cast including Penélope Cruz, Ana de Armas, Édgar Ramirez, and more. And we finish the show out with a drive-in feature called Infamous, which stars Bella Thorne and Jake Manley.

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Extra Milestone – Seven Chances (1925)

The Extra Milestone crew has so far been “silent” when it comes to covering silent films, and for that, we have no excuse. But consider this deep dive of Buster Keaton’s comedic classic Seven Chances to be our comeuppance! That’s right, the screwball romantic comedy that helped define the genre recently celebrated 95 glorious years, making this the oldest film we’ve ever covered on the show. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry (from laughing), and just maybe you’ll fall in love with one of the greatest actor-directors in all of film history.

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The 25 Best Films of 2020 (So Far)

If anything, curating a list of 2020’s finest films feels more necessary and useful than ever. While many film lovers have used their time sheltering at home to catch up on classic cinema (as we all should), I’ve spent the last several months trying to see at least 4 or 5 new movies a week via screeners and the aforementioned avenues. Now that we’ve reached the halfway point of this bizarre, unpredictable year, I want to share the 25 films that have left the deepest impact on me, whether they be a festival indie from last year just now getting a bigger release, a more mainstream feature from the first block of the year, or somewhere in between, I hope there’s at least one positive recommendation in this list for everyone.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #172 – Da 5 Bloods, Artemis Fowl, The King of Staten Island

Special guest Charlie Ridgely of Comicbook.com joins the show for a death-defying review of Spike Lee’s new joint Da 5 Bloods, which is now streaming on Netflix. We also answer a listener question, rant about Artemis Fowl (now on Disney+), and finish things out with a balanced discussion of Judd Apatow’s new dramedy The King of Staten Island starring Pete Davidson and Bill Burr, which just came out on VOD.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #171 – Shirley, Becky, Deerskin, Tommaso

We haven’t left our cabin for two months, but the good news is we have an internet connection, which means we just watched Shirley on Hulu! After a brief discussion of HBO Max and our current efforts to support causes related to the Black Lives Matter movement, we review some of the notable film releases of the last week, including Shirley from director Josephine Decker starring Elisabeth Moss and Michael Stuhlbarg, Becky starring Lulu Wilson and Kevin James, Deerskin from French director Quentin Dupieux, and Tommaso from director Abel Ferrara starring Willem Dafoe.

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Extra Milestone – Pinocchio (1940)

When you wish upon a Pod, doesn’t matter which host you are. When you wish upon a Pod, your streams come true. That’s right. We’re celebrating the 80th anniversary of Pinocchio this month on Extra Milestone. But first, a quick word from our good friend, Willt—I mean Walt Disney. Also, be sure to stick around toward the end of the show for a major announcement concerning the Extra Milestone podcast!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #170 – The High Note, Body Cam, Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich, Hope Gap

This past week may not have opened on a, ahem, high note, but that doesn’t mean the Cinemaholics are tuning out on the latest batch of film releases. After a quick birthday shoutout for our favorite movies ever and a mini review of “Space Force” on Netflix, we jump into our in-depth review of The High Note, a new feel-good comedy-drama starring Dakota Johnson, Tracee Ellis Ross, Ice Cube, and Kelvin Harrison Jr. We also discuss Body Cam starring Mary J. Blige and Nat Wolff, the new Netflix documentary mini-series Jeffrey Epstein: Filthy Rich, and Hope Gap starring Annette Bening and Bill Nighy.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #169 – The Lovebirds, The Vast of Night, The Painter and the Thief, To the Stars

The Lovebirds just hit Netflix, so Jon and Will are hitting the mic to talk about it. Does this new action rom-com starring Issa Rae and Kumail Nanjiani, which was originally planned for a theatrical release, scratch our itch for a studio comedy hitting the early ebbs of summer? Also, stay tuned for some extra reviews this week, including The Vast of Night, an indie sci-fi movie that just hit Amazon Prime Video and drive-in theaters. Jon gets a chance to express his love for The Painter and the Thief, a recent Sundance documentary that’s now available via VOD. And the Cinemaholics finish the episode with a more topical discussion about black and white films, tied in with a review of To the Stars, another VOD release.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – #ReleaseTheSnyderCut (Feat. Dan Murrell)

Special guests Dan Murrell and Sam Noland are here to chat about Zack Snyder’s recently announced director’s cut of Justice League, which came out in 2017 to mostly negative reviews (from us, included). We break down this big news, explain what it means for the movie industry, and speculate about what the cut might look and feel like and what other director’s cuts we’re hoping to see someday.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #168 – Scoob!

Zoinks! Like, we’re finally reviewing Scoob! man! I’m Mathew Lillard, the real voice of Shaggy, and Jon and Will hired me to write this episode description for them. Those guys really know how to make a dude like me feel welcome. So like, special guests Matt Serafini and Chris Sheridan are totally here to help out, man! But I gotta be honest, why can’t we ever review, like, a Burger King or something? Anyway, you enjoy this review of Scoob! while I stay in the van and enjoy this chocolate pizza. What do you think, Frank—er, I mean Scoob? RUH-ROH RAGGY! What is it, Scoob? Wait, is that a…a…P-P-P-ODCAST JUMP THE SHARK MOMENT?! (running away sound effects)

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Cinemaholics Podcast #167 – Valley Girl, Capone, Driveways, Spaceship Earth, Becoming, The Wrong Missy

Like, we’re totally traveling to the 80s, man! Will our review of Valley Girl starring Jessica Rothe be as bitchin’ as the original from 1983? As if! But we go even further back in time to discuss Josh Trank’s new biopic Capone starring Tom Hardy, and something smells with this movie, dude! Let’s slow down a bit and relax by the driveway in Driveways, which is a super chill indie drama, don’t have a cow! Forget the 80s, though, let’s go to the 90s in Spaceship Earth, a new Sundance documentary about some radical hippies who lived in a Biosphere back in 1991. Far out, man! On Netflix, we got Becoming, a new doc about Michelle Obama, so like hail to the former chief’s ex-ce-llent first lady. And last, Jon asks Will, “where your beef?!” with The Wrong Missy, a new Netflix comedy starring David Spade and Lauren Lapkus. Guess that one gagged Will with a spoon!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #166 – Beastie Boys Story, The Half of It, Hollywood, Dangerous Lies, Clementine

Hit it! Yo it’s Jon and Will and they’re here to chat, CINEMAHOLICS IS WHERE IT’S AT. A podcast, a film show, reviews galore. If you’re not into it, there’s the DOOR. It starts with Beastie Boys and here’s their Story, an Apple TV doc about all their glory. On Netflix we stan, Alice Wu’s romance, it’s THE HALF OF IT, and you stand no CHANCE. We go to Hollywood, the big Ryan Murphy joint, again on Netflix, so yeah what’s the POINT. Of watchin’ what else, like Dangerous Lies, BUT THAT’S ON NETFLIX TOO, man time flies. So if you’re quite unsure, about what to watch, we got one more cure, CLEMENTINE on VOD kicks it up a NOTCH! notch…notch…notch…notch…notch.

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I Rewatched ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker,’ and it Actually Taught Me Something Invaluable

I saw Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker on opening night, and I doubt I could’ve been less excited for it. So much venom had been spewed at the Star Wars brand by this point, so even mentioning the name of certain chapters came at the risk of actually losing friendships. What’s more, its release signaled the start of what all of my work supervisors assured me would be the most hectic few weeks in our theater’s short history — now, of course, I would practically kill for those days — and my sense of dread was simply too powerful to ignore.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – The Plot Against America

Special guest Emily Kubincanek joins us for a bonus review of The Plot Against America, a new HBO mini-series starring Zoe Kazan, Winona Ryder, John Turturro, and many more. From David Simon (creator of The Wire), this alternate history drama follows a Jewish family in 1940s New Jersey trying to grapple with the presidency of Charles Lindbergh, who wins on a platform of staying out of World War II and has a history of antisemitism.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #165 – Bad Education, The Willoughbys, True History of the Kelly Gang, Extraction, Normal People

Hey folks, Coach here. Ready to tell you all about our Bad Education review this week. Now on HBO. Ya gotta trust your teachers, but what if your superintendent was secretly Hugh Jackman? What if Allison Janney was his right hand? Don’t worry. I got my eye on both ’em. Anyway, we also got you folks covered on The Willoughbys, the new Netflix animated film. Time for a history lesson with True History of the Kelly Gang, which just hit VOD. Extraction is on Netflix too, and I gotta say, I love me an action flick with Chris Hemsworth. Finally, we get a little sappy and romantic, what’s new, with Normal People, which just dropped its first season on Hulu. If it’s anything like the season I got comin’ up in the fall, it’s a doozy. Anyway. Coach, OUT!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #164 – Sergio, Sea Fever, Selah and the Spades, Abe, Endings Beginnings

Well, the news is out. Jon and Will’s parents just got married, which means Cinemaholics has a brand new intro to mark the occasion. Once that’s out of the way, the bruthas get down to business reviewing Sergio, the new Netflix film starring Wagner Moura and Ana de Armas. After a quick chat about their favorite flicks of 2020 so far, the mismatched duo discuss the new sci-fi horror thriller Sea Fever, high school indie Selah and the Spades on Prime Video, Abe starring Noah Schnapp of “Stranger Things” fame, and Endings, Beginnings from Like Crazy director Drake Doremus starring Shailene Woodley, Sebastian Stan, and Jamie Dornan.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #163 – Trolls: World Tour, Tigertail, Vivarium, Love Wedding Repeat, Impractical Jokers: The Movie

We may not be allowed to explore the world right now, but a mere quarantine won’t stop these Trolls from rocking out. In this action-packed episode of Cinemaholics, we open with an extended Off-Topics section covering all the latest shows we’ve been watching, including Quibi, for some reason. After a quick PSA, we discuss DreamWorks and Universal’s surprise straight-to-streaming sequel, Trolls: World Tour. Then we slow things way down to discuss Tigertail, a new original Netflix drama starring Tzi Ma. Looking for a weird sci-fi indie starring Jesse Eisenberg and Imogen Poots? Look no further than Vivarium. There’s also Love Wedding Repeat, another new Netflix movie, but this one is a multiverse rom-com starring Sam Claflin and Olivia Munn. Finally, Will Ashton gets a bit serious for our detailed, practical review of Impractical Jokers: The Movie, based on the truTV show.

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‘The Doors Between Us’ is an Insightful Indie Comedy for these Self-Isolated Times

Eight complete strangers sectioned off into four curiously matched pairs awaken in various rooms of an unfamiliar suburban house. None of them can recall how they may have gotten there, nor is there any apparent method of exit. For the foreseeable future, they’re trapped, and none of them are alone. So describes the events of The Doors Between Us, a micro-indie film produced in Lakewood, Colorado, which held its one-night-only premiere on a single, exciting evening back in December.

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‘Trolls: World Tour’ Should Be Taken Extra Seriously, Please

Harmony is a utopia. But at what cost? The denizens of Trolls: World Tour, a sequel to the well-received DreamWorks Animation film from 2016, begin this self-examination in segregated exile. What is the world of Trolls if not a watermark of our own “United” States? Because these are trolls are a lot of things, but united is certainly not one of them.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #162 – Bacurau, The Platform, McMillion$, Swallow, Coffee & Kareem

Special guest Sam Noland joins us for a weird review of the new weird western Bacurau, now available through some streaming platforms and maybe your local arthouse theater. The gang also discusses a new sci-fi horror flick called The Platform on Netflix, the HBO documentary mini-series McMillion$, yet another sci-fi horror flick called Swallow starring Haley Bennett, and stoner buddy comedy Coffee & Kareem on Netflix starring Ed Helms and Taraji P. Henson.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #161 – Tiger King, Bloodshot, Crip Camp, Slay the Dragon

From rednecks to orange chests, we’ve to you covered this week on Cinemaholics. First we dive into the insanity of Joe Exotic in the new Netflix documentary series, Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness. Then we really kick into gear for our review of Bloodshot, a Vin Diesel action movie that only briefly appeared in theaters before getting blasted into VOD. Last, we discuss a pair of more inspiring documentaries, which include Crip Camp on Netflix from Higher Ground Productions (owned by Barack and Michelle Obama) and Slay the Dragon, a documentary about gerrymandering from Magnolia Pictures.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #160 – Big Time Adolescence, The Banker, Stargirl, Lost Girls

The cinema may be closed, but not Cinemaholics! We’re covering some of the most notable new streaming releases hitting your WiFi router, which include a Sundance indie on Hulu starring Pete Davidson, a would-be Oscar contender on Apple TV+ starring Anthony Mackie and Samuel L. Jackson, a Disney+ original music drama starring Grace VanderWaal, and a crime drama on Netflix starring Amy Ryan.

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Vote for Our Next Extra Milestone: Pinocchio, La Dolce Vita, Brazil, The Breakfast Club (And More!)

The time has come yet again for you, our most loyal and dedicated of listeners, to do the hardest part of our job for us by deciding which film to delve into on the next Extra Milestone! February yielded a fascinating and varied selection, and it was hard enough to narrow it down to a measly seven. But now is the time to select the ultimate winner. You may choose from the following:

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Extra Milestone – His Girl Friday (1940)

Here’s the big scoop! For our February Extra Milestone, we’re getting down and dirty with His Girl Friday, see. Directed by Howard Hawks and starring Cary Grant, Rosalind Russell, Ralph Bellamy (as himself?), and many others, we discuss how this 1940 film was made and what we think of it today, 80 years later.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #159 – The Hunt, Guns Akimbo, I Still Believe, Never Rarely Sometimes Always

Special guest Amanda the Jedi joins us all the way from YouTube to review a host of controversial new films most of us can’t see in theaters right now, including The Hunt starring Betty Gilpin, Guns Akimbo starring Daniel Radcliffe and Samara Weaving, I Still Believe starring Britt Robertson and her boyfriend Archie (fine, KJ Apa), and Never Rarely Sometimes Always starring Sidney Flanigan and Talia Ryder.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #157 – The Invisible Man, A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon, Wendy, The Call of the Wild

Special guest The Invisible Man comes on the show to talk about his own movie The Invisible Man, which was directed by Leigh Whannell and stars Elisabeth Moss. So stay tuned to hear our thoughts on the latest Blumhouse horror movie, which has most audiences and critics pleasantly spooked. The Cinemaholics also have a chance to discuss the other new releases of the week, including Wendy, Shaun the Sheep 2, and more.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #156 – Portrait of a Lady on Fire

Special guests Julia Teti and Emily Kubincanek join Jon and Will for an in-depth review of Portrait of a Lady on Fire, one of the most universally acclaimed new films from the last year. Directed by Céline Sciamma, this sweeping romantic drama centers around an intense love affair between a young painter (Noémie Merlant) and the woman she is secretly painting a portrait of (Adèle Haenel).

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Vote For Our Next Extra Milestone: His Girl Friday, The Shop Around the Corner, Tremors, Before Sunrise (And More!)

Here on Cinemaholics, we don’t just stop with current realms of cinema. Once a month, we take a trip back in time to look at a film that has gone the extra mile to remain relevant all these years later. But selecting that film isn’t always easy! Welcome to this month’s Extra Milestone Poll, in which YOU get to decide what we break down on our next episode.

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Extra Milestone – Young Frankenstein (1974)

It’s been over four decades, and Mel Brooks still has us laughing. As we mark the 45th anniversary of Young Frankenstein, Jon and Sam discuss the spooky comedy’s legacy as one of our latest “Extra Milestone” films. Starring Gene Wilder, Peter Boyle, Marty Feldman, Teri Garr, and many more familiar faces, Young Frankenstein proves that even a parody film can be just as thrilling and satisfying as a bonafide sequel in the Universal Monsters canon.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #154 – Birds of Prey, Horse Girl, BoJack Horseman, Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made

Ready to be emancipated from January movie season? Birds of Prey (And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn) just flew into theaters, and the Cinemaholics are ready to discuss. Stay tuned for reviews of the new Netflix film Horse Girl starring Alison Brie, our quick Season 6 discussion of BoJack Horseman, and the surprisingly good new Disney+ original movie Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made.

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Oscars 2020 – If We Picked The Winners!

On a special bonus episode of Cinemaholics, we pick our own winners for the 2020 Oscars ceremony. Inspired by the Siskel and Ebert classic format, we go through the nominees of almost every category and explain our favorites.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #153 – Sundance 2020, Miss Americana, The Rhythm Section, Gretel & Hansel

It’s that time of year again, when Jon goes to see way too many movies in Park City, Utah, then comes back to tell us all about them. In addition to giving an overview of the Sundance Film Festival, Jon joins Will for in-depth reviews of the new Taylor Swift documentary Miss Americana, The Rhythm Section starring Blake Lively and Jude Law, and the dark fantasy reimagining Gretel & Hansel.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #152 – The Gentlemen, Color Out of Space, Clemency, A Fall From Grace, VHYes

This week, a couple of gents got together to discuss The Gentlemen, the newest film from writer/director Guy Ritchie. With Jon Negroni still shivering in the cold at the Sundance Film Festival, Will Ashton and special guest Sam Noland go across the pond to see what is being considered a return-to-form for the British filmmaker by some and a regressive piece of work by others. Where do these two lads land? Listen to this week’s episode to find out, in addition to hearing our thoughts on Richard Stanley’s H.P. Lovecraft adaptation, Color Out of Space, starring Nicolas Cage, Tyler Perry’s Netflix Original, A Fall From Grace, Clemency starring Alfre Woodard, and a lot more.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #151 – Dolittle, Bad Boys for Life

It’s survival of the fittest this week on Cinemaholics, which means special guest Cory Woodroof has stepped up to fill in for Jon while he’s away at Sundance. Cory and Will dive into some catch-up reviews, plus they react to the Oscars 2020 nominations before reviewing the two wide releases this week: Dolittle and Bad Boys for Life.

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Ranking the ENTIRE Star Wars Saga, from ‘The Phantom Menace’ to ‘The Rise of Skywalker’

The Skywalker Saga as we know it has been over for the better part of a month now, so Jon and I decided that it would be a fun idea to go over the 42-year-old (and counting!) history of the Star Wars Galaxy. The two of us spent nearly three hours presenting our carefully constructed individual rankings of the films (ALL of them), making plenty of stops along the way to justify our varied positions.

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The Top 25 Films of 2019

2019 was filled with era-defining blockbusters, emotionally compact dramas, and just about every other type of exciting feature in between. Many of these films were true gems, but others might’ve gotten a little lost in the shuffle of weekly big screen releases and an onslaught of new content championed by burgeoning streaming services. Despite all the chaos, 29 of our contributors were able to pinpoint their absolute favorite releases of the year.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #149 – Top 10 Films of 2019

Special guest Sam Noland joins us for a countdown of our favorite films this year, as well as our general reflections on 2019. You’ll also hear voice recordings from Cinemaholics contributors all across the globe who picked vastly different films for their own lists, which all factor into our definitive Top 25 rankings, which you’ll hear at the end of the episode along with outliers and honorable mentions. This is our longest episode of Cinemaholics yet, but we hope you give the whole episode a listen as we deep dive into a wide variety of films that made this past year just a little better.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Cats

We saw Cats. Is it purrfect, or should audiences catnip this in the bud? We saw Cats. Directed and co-written by Tom Hooper, Cats is based on the long-running 1981 musical from Andrew Lloyd Webber. It stars James Corden, Judi Dench, Jason Derulo, Idris Elba, Jennifer Hudson, Ian McKellen, Taylor Swift, Rebel Wilson, Ray Winstone, […]

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‘The Rise of Skywalker’ is a Balancing Act of Star Wars at its Best. And Worst.

With The Rise of Skywalker, we now have a definitive conclusion to the latest official trilogy from the official kingmakers at Disney, who set out to construct a brand new direction for a boundless franchise. As a capper to this corner of stories, The Rise of Skywalker is an incredible finale, no question. But like its central opposing forces, it’s filled with all the bad and only most of the good there is to be found in blockbuster cinema’s most beloved — and scrutinized — canon.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #146 – Winter Movie Preview 2019-2020

It’s the most cinematic time of the year…for the cinemaholics, at least! Jon and Will discuss the films they’re most excited about watching from now until the end of February, along with some dark horse picks that have them more curious than ever about the upcoming winter season.

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Interview – Kelvin Harrison Jr. Talks ‘Waves’ and the Current State of Filmmaking

If you’ve been following Cinemaholics closely over the last year, you’ll know I’ve been an outspoken proponent of Kelvin Harrison Jr. as one of the best actors of the year, first due to his landmark performance in Luce from this past summer (which is still on my Top 10 movies of the year list), and now in Waves, a slow burn A24 indie that has a real chance at scoring some Oscar nominations.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #145 – Knives Out, 1917, Noelle, Mickey and the Bear, 21 Bridges, Let it Snow, By the Grace of God

This week, every movie is a suspect. Jon and Will discuss the latest releases, including Rian Johnson’s modern whodunnit-murder-mystery ensemble, Knives Out, which stars way too many people to mention. We also talk Christmas movies on streaming, catch up on recent flicks we missed, and cover a few indies you might want to add to your ever-growing radar.

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Let’s play Cinephile! A card game for movie nerds.

It’s game night for the Cinemaholics, as we play Cinephile on this week’s bonus show, featuring special guests Sam Noland and Cory Woodroof. The gang competes to recall the filmographies of John Travolta, Bruce Willis, Penelope Cruz, and Greta Gerwig. Plus, a few rounds of “six degrees of separation,” where we attempt to link two actors at random through their associated roles with other actors!

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‘Waves’ Has A Lot To Say About Being A Parent. Especially If You Aren’t One.

Director Trey Edward Shults has a clear interest in the tools needed for families to survive whatever dangers may come their way. His sophomore film from 2017, It Comes at Night—also an A24 film—explored a heightened metaphor for the terrors parents inflict upon their children just as easily as they themselves fear it, and in Waves, Shults presents a far more grounded, but equally as harrowing tale about the fragility of success in modern America.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Waves, Honey Boy

Special guest Brandon Katz joins us for a bonus episode of Cinemaholics. We dive into Waves, the new A24 drama starring Kelvin Harrison Jr., Taylor Russell, and Sterling K. Brown. After that, we review Honey Boy from Amazon Studios, which stars Shia LaBeouf as his own father in a semi-autobiographical drama about his life as a child actor coming of age.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #142 – Doctor Sleep, Last Christmas, Playing with Fire

Special guest Cory Woodroof joins Will Ashton for an in-depth review of Doctor Sleep, a spiritual sequel to Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, but also an adaptation of Stephen King’s novel of the same name starring Ewan McGregor and Rebecca Ferguson. In addition to reviewing Last Christmas and Playing with Fire, Cory and Will answer the question of the week, offer second opinions of Jojo Rabbit and Marriage Story, and briefly review Seth Meyers: Lobby Baby.

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Extra Milestone – Ed Wood (1994)

This is the episode we’ll be remembered for. This month on Extra Milestone, Jon, Sam, and Will discuss Tim Burton’s Ed Wood, which celebrates its 25th anniversary of release. We discuss how the film got made, its legacy over the years, and what we really think about it after all this time.

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‘Harriet’ Wields A Powerful And Much-Needed Story. But It’s Missing Tubman’s True Humanity.

A biopic about American historical figure Harriet Tubman has been long overdue. You can’t go through American history without reading or hearing her name and yet filmmakers have steered away from her story until now. Finally, Kasi Lemmons brings the legendary abolitionist’s life to the big screen in her biopic Harriet, and while her story is one every American should know, the way the film tells it is not without fault.

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Interview – Gregory Allen Howard, Screenwriter of ‘Harriet’

Gregory Allen Howard has been working on bringing the story of Harriet Tubman to the screen for over 20 years. Despite Hollywood’s dismissal of his script, Howard continued to persist in getting his film made and he finally found a partner in director-writer Kasi Lemmons. We talked to the legendary screenwriter about what it took to get the story of such a historical figure to the new biopic Harriet.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #139 – Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, Zombieland: Double Tap, El Camino, Parasite

We’ve let the movies pile up over the last few weeks, which means it’s time for a CINEMAHOLICS REVIEW-ATHON! We start off with the big Disney wide release, Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, then dive into Zombieland: Double Tap and catch up on El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie. From there, we get into some mini reviews that range from stellar indies to major new shows hitting streaming. This is a packed episode, so be sure to check out the show notes below to see everything we covered.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #138 – Gemini Man, Mister America, In the Tall Grass

This week, we’re seeing double. Jon and Will review Gemini Man, a new action-thriller-spy-clone film starring Will Smith from acclaimed writer and director Ang Lee. Known for its off-kilter shooting style and aggressively high frame rate, Gemini Man has critics and audiences torn, but where do the Cinemaholics stand? Also in the show, Will shares his thoughts on two other new films: Mister America and In the Tall Grass. And Jon briefly discusses his experience playing Borderlands 3 for Playstation 4.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #137 – Joker

A couple jokers reviewing Joker? What could go right? Jon and Will discuss the controversial new film starring Joaquin Phoenix from director Todd Phillips of The Hangover series and other 2000s comedies your dad probably loves. They also dive into some discussion around In the Shadow of the Moon, The Kill Team, The Politician, and more. But the real killing joke is that theme music, which is “Smile” by Jimmy Durante.

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‘Joker’ Isn’t Just Missing A Good Punchline, It’s Missing A Soul

Since his first appearance in 1940, the Joker as a comic book villain (and later TV/Film/Video Game villain) has been an ever-evolving enigma, much like his darkly heroic counterpart. So it makes perfect sense for the films to continuously reinvent a character like the Joker, who serves a litany of important functions as an antagonistic presence.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #136 – Judy, Abominable

Special guest Sam Noland returns for a packed episode filled with movie news and reviews you can only find at Cinemaholics, or perhaps somewhere over the rainbow. That’s right, after some movie news chat about The Irishman and Spider-Man returning to the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Sam and Will review Judy, a new biopic about the legendary actress and singer, Judy Garland, starring Renée Zellweger. Also, Will briefly shares his thoughts on Abominable, the latest animated film from DreamWorks.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – The Fanatic

On this special bonus episode of the show, Will Ashton and Cory Woodroof dive into the insanity of The Fanatic, a new film starring John Travolta directed and co-written by Fred Durst. Enjoy?

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Cinemaholics Podcast #134 – Hustlers

This week’s show is entirely devoted to reviewing Hustlers, the new stripper-crime-craper starring Jennifer Lopez, Constance Wu, and many others you’ll love to recognize. Our theme music this week is “Criminal” by Fiona Apple.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #133 – It Chapter Two

Do Jon and Will float by on charm, too? Or…TWO?! This week on Cinemaholics, Jon and Will discuss It Chapter Two, the followup to the wildly successful 2017 horror film/Stephen King adaptation. They also talk about Where’d You Go Bernadette, Luce, The Nightingale, Dave Chapelle: Sticks & Stones, American Factory, and Brittany Runs a Marathon.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #132 – Fall Movie Preview 2019

After recapping the summer movie season and discussing 2019’s best films thus far, Jon and Will dive into a full preview of what’s coming out this fall, including their most anticipated films, a few dark horses, and even some flicks they’ve already seen ahead of time.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #131 – Ready or Not

This week’s episode of Cinemaholics isn’t a game. We’re reviewing Ready or Not, a new horror thriller/comedy starring Samara Weaving, plus we’re diving into some of the biggest announcements coming out of Disney’s D23 Expo, which includes updates about Marvel, Star Wars, Pixar, and of course, Disney+. We also tackle a few mini reviews, which […]

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Extra Milestone – Easy Rider (1969) and Do the Right Thing (1989)

It might be several weeks late, but July’s EXTRA MILESTONE is here! With Jon away on vacation, Will Ashton and Sam Noland decided to tackle not one, but two notable classics celebrating anniversaries. First up is Dennis Hopper’s Easy Rider, the counterculture classic celebrating its 50th anniversary, followed by Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing, the eternally relevant commentary on racial tensions celebrating its 30th anniversary.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #129 – The Kitchen

If you can’t handle the heat, stay out of Julia and Kimber’s podcast about The Kitchen, a new female-led gangster movie starring Tiffany Haddish, Elisabeth Moss, and Melissa McCarthy. That’s right, Julia Teti and Kimber Myers are guest hosting this episode of the show, which dives deep into the directorial debut of film writer Andrea Berloff (Straight Outta Compton).

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Ranking Every Narrative Manson Murder Film

2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the infamous Manson Murders — a tragic chain of senseless killings irreparably changing the world forever, and once broadly referred to by Don McLean as one of “the days the music died.” As is true with just about any point in time of this historical caliber, these events have been dramatized in various ways via the cinematic medium. With three films on the subject being distributed this year alone, I decided the time was right to witness and rank each and every one of them that I could get my hands on.

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‘The Nightingale’ Review – Jennifer Kent Chases Demons in this Harrowing Tale

Cruelty is currency, and salvation is nothing more than a branch thrown into a ravaging, rapid river. This is the world Jennifer Kent throws her audience, unwillingly, into for her sophomore feature, The Nightingale. A divisive and often outright dread-inducing picture, Kent’s film rides through the Tasmanian wilderness with a steadfast purpose, to confront and kill the colonizing demons that haunt her main characters by body and land. To an extent, the vindictiveness of Kent’s picture thrives in the lush greenery of Tasmania. But the bonds that hold her characters together break under pressure.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #127 – Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood

Get ready to cruise down the sunset strip to WSJ radio (Will/Sam/Jon), because we’re reviewing Once Upon a Time…In Hollywood, the latest film from director/writer Quentin Tarantino, which stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt, Margot Robbie, and a huge cast of surprise faces you’ll probably recognize. This is one of our most divisive conversations of the year, so you don’t want to miss it, ya dig?

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Wild Rose

Julia Teti and Sam Noland join Jon Negroni for an Indie Panel discussion of Wild Rose, a new drama about a country music singer (Jessie Buckley) who lives in Scotland but dreams of somehow going to Nashville to realize her dreams, despite all the obstacles standing in her way.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #126 – The Lion King, Marvel’s Phase 4, and that Cats Trailer

Before we indulge in Disney’s recycle of life by reviewing The Lion King, the newest “reimgainging” of one of their animated classics, the Cinemaholics catch up on the latest details coming out of Comic Con, specifically the big announcements surrounding Marvel’s next timeline of films and streaming releases. Plus, we get into a fur-raising discussion […]

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Midsommar

Jon, Will, and Julia escape the daylight and discuss Midsommar, the latest “horror” film from director/writer Ari Aster and A24. Yes, we’re doing another bonus review on an A24 movie. We start with a spoiler-free overview of our thoughts, then we dive into spoiler-filled deep dive of the film. Midsommar stars Florence Pugh, Jack Reynor, William Jackson Harper, Will Poulter, and Vilhelm Blomgren.

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Before ‘Midsommar,’ There Was ‘The Wicker Man,’ The Definitive Folk Horror Film

The time has come yet again for a new release to be completely steamrolled at the box office by an installment of the Marvel Cinematic Universe — and shamefully so, if you ask me. The unfortunate and doomed film comes this time in the form of A24’s Midsommar, a folk mystery/thriller from Hereditary director Ari Aster, which just so happens to be one of the best movies of the year. 

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Cinemaholics Podcast #124 – Spider-Man: Far From Home

Special guest and fellow webhead Matt Serafini joins us for a full review of Spider-Man: Far From Home, the newest Marvel film featuring Tom Holland as everyone’s favorite neighborhood superhero. We also catch up on some other films and shows we’ve been watching, including Stranger Things Season 3, Anima, and Annabelle Comes Home. This week’s […]

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This 4th Of July Weekend, Discover ‘The History Project’

The children are our future. So how do they perceive our past? In the documentary, The History Project, producers Daniel Ahrens and Jason Flood compiled a collection of video projects from both middle schoolers and high schoolers depicting the events that shaped our nation’s history. The result is an amusing, revealing, often bizarre and surprisingly touching […]

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Extra Milestone – Alien (1979)

Jon, Will, Sam, and Julia talk about Ridley Scott’s Alien, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this month! The Cinemaholics crew debates the film’s most iconic moments, whether or not it’s a masterpiece, and more.

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‘A Hard Day’s Night’ Was The First Beatles Movie, And It Might Still Be The Best

This past weekend saw the release of Danny Boyle’s Yesterday, a high-concept dram-com with a hint of romance in which an unprecedented global anomaly erases The Beatles (among other cultural bullet points) from history. The Fab Four are allowed to live on, however, in the baffled memory of struggling musician Jack (Himesh Patel), the only one with any understanding of what’s happened.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #123 – Yesterday

Do we believe in Yesterday? Special guest Kimber Myers joins the show to discuss the latest film from director Danny Boyle and screenwriter Richard Curtis, which explores a world where the Beatles never existed, and the one person who remembers them tries to pass their legendary music off as his own. We also discuss Midsommar and Wild Rose, then dive into some feedback from last week’s show.

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Interview – Gary Dauberman, Director of ‘Annabelle Comes Home’

If you’re a fan of the Annabelle and Conjuring movies, then we have a special treat for you this week. I recently spoke with Gary Dauberman, writer and director of the new horror film Anabelle Comes Home, which hits theaters later this week. Dauberman was also the screenwriter for the first Annabelle in 2014, along with Annabelle: Creation and The Nun. He co-wrote It from 2017 and is the executive producer and co-writer for Swamp Thing, a new DC Comics series on streaming.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #122 – Toy Story 4

Special guest Charlie Ridgely (ComicBook.com) joins us for some playtime with Woody and the gang in Toy Story 4, the latest Toy Story film from Pixar. We discuss our thoughts and feelings on the overall series, plus we kick off the episode with some discussion about our favorite films of the year so far.

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Where ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Went Right Is Where ‘The Dead Don’t Die’ Went Wrong

When it came to selecting the Movie of the Week, there was no clearer choice than George A. Romero’s inimitable classic Night of the Living Dead, especially with the recent release of Jim Jarmusch’s zombie comedy The Dead Don’t Die, which was heavily inspired by the 1968 film. Night of the Living Dead wasn’t the first film to feature the undead, but it is widely considered to be the definitive introduction for mainstream audiences. The mythology it established all those years ago continues to be the standard for almost every other zombie movie, TV show, or other medium in the genre to come out since.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #121 – Men in Black: International, The Dead Don’t Die, Changeland

Suit up. Jon and Will are back in black to discuss Men in Black: International, the fourth film in the franchise, now starring Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson as the memory-wiping, alien-saving agents. They also discuss the lackluster summer box office in 2019 and how this may affect theatrical releases in the future. And you’ll hear reviews for Jim Jarmusch’s “dry zombie comedy” The Dead Don’t Die and Seth Green’s directorial debut Changeland.

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10 Kaijū Movies You Should Watch (Or Re-watch) After ‘Godzilla: King of the Monsters’

It’s been two weeks since the release of Michael Dougherty’s long-awaited sequel Godzilla: King of the Monsters, which hit theaters to a mixed critical reaction and moderate financial success. It hasn’t received the widespread enthusiasm Legendary and Warner Bros. were likely hoping for, but the film does contribute to the now 65-year old legacy of the world’s favorite giant monster in more ways than one. 

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Cinemaholics Podcast #120 – Dark Phoenix, Late Night, The Secret Life of Pets 2, The Souvenir

Have you tried…not being a Cinemaholic? The “X-Men” franchise is on its last wings these days, so Jon and Will are here to discuss Dark Phoenix, Fox’s last breath of fire before Disney bought the rights to these characters. We also discuss the new comedy Late Night starring Mindy Kaling and Emma Thompson, The Secret Life of Pets 2 from Illumination, and Joanna Hogg’s latest film The Souvenir from A24.

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‘Dark Phoenix’ Review – The X-Men Franchise Ends As It Did The First Time, By Flaming Out Spectacularly.

19 years of X-Men films have led to one very awkward moment. A patchwork of sagas ranging from transcendent to bottom-dweller couldn’t have a picked a flatter vehicle for punctuating a complex legacy now in the hands of Disney upon the Disney-Fox merger. And to make matters more confused, we still have another one of these ancillary films, New Mutants, delayed to next spring for an unrelated and likely inconsequential misadventure. For now, Dark Phoenix effectively closes the book on a story that already has two, maybe three endings as it is.

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‘Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am’ Review – The Living Literary Icon Gets A Meditative Documentary Of Her Own

Where there once stood the pillar of the white, male gaze in literature, Toni Morrison exchanged her chisel for a sledgehammer and there, knocked it down. The author, editor, and icon has amassed a following worthy of her extraordinary verve. A towering figure in the world of fiction, Morrison’s titles include The Bluest Eye, Song of Solomon, Tar Baby, and Beloved, among many others. She is a Nobel Peace Prize winner in literature and, will have you know, she makes the best carrot cake you will ever have.

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Extra Milestone – The 400 Blows (1959)

Jon, Will, and Sam talk about François Truffaut’s The 400 Blows, which began the French New Wave of Cinema in the late 1950s. We discuss the significance of the film and why it’s essential viewing for cinemaholics, plus we debate the meaning behind the film’s controversial ending.

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‘Godzilla: King of the Monsters’ Review – Keep Your Expectations Less Than God-Sized

Over the past 65 years, there have been 35 films featuring Godzilla (or 38 if you’re being technical), a super-powered reptilian giant and titan of the ancient world, born against his will from the complicit ashes of mankind’s mistakes. He’s a rightful god among monsters and humans alike, and such is the case in this latest outing of the world’s favorite monster, in which there might be some serious competition for the title of “King.”

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‘Always Be My Maybe’ Review – More Like Always Be My Must See

Sifting through Netflix’s endless rolodex of content can be daunting. What should you watch? What are the streaming overlords recommending? Is there a category curated specifically for one’s own tastes? Mind-boggling algorithms aside, there are sometimes those movies that just pop up out of nowhere (fine, not out of nowhere exactly, I just went through the algorithm process). But these are the movies that always seem to simply say, “maybe.” Maybe this is the one. And this time, that “maybe” is literal in Always Be My Maybe, which is now streaming on Netflix and stars Ali Wong and Randall Park.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #118 – Aladdin, The Perfection, Brightburn

Do you trust us? Great! We’re sweeping you off your feet as we review a whole new Disney live-action remake, this time covering everyone’s favorite street rat, Aladdin, in Aladdin. We also discuss The Perfection, a new Netflix film you have to hear to believe, and Brightburn, a super-hero-horror flick that will probably make you […]

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‘Booksmart’ Review – Olivia Wilde Breaks All The Right Rules In Her Directorial Debut

Every teen generation tends to get defined by the media they consume and how they consume it. Sure, not everyone can relate with the exact feeling a single song from the 70s can invoke when played in a film like Dazed and Confused, or perhaps what an early 2000s pop culture reference might inform in Superbad. But in Booksmart, the tradition of expanding relatability beyond the constraints and memories of a given era continues in this lovingly ambitious feature debut from actor-turned-filmmaker Olivia Wilde.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Game of Thrones Series Finale

Fellow Game of Thrones fanatics Kimber Myers and Julia Teti join us for a full-length discussion of the hit HBO series and its 8-season finale. We discuss what we liked and disliked, what surprised us, and how the legacy of Game of Thrones may shape pop culture for winters to come.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #117 – John Wick: Chapter 3 Parabellum

We’re ready to get in on the action of John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum, the third installment of the ongoing Keanu Reeves hitman franchise from director Chad Stahelski and screenwriter Derek Kolstad. We kick off the show with Off-Topics and briefly catch up on some of the new films we saw this week and last week but don’t have time to fully review.

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‘John Wick: Chapter 3 Parabellum’ Review – Consider Me a Renewed Fan of the Series

In my view, 2014’s John Wick is the ultimate Redbox movie. On the surface, it looks like your typical, generic B-movie action thriller. It features a recognizable actor who was out of the limelight at the time, and to some, past his prime. In this case, that actor was Keanu Reeves, and this revenge tale looked like any other generic action romp, the likes of which you typically find crowded in those recognizable movie machines outside of Wal-Mart.

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Cinemaholics Podcast – Under the Silver Lake

Special guest Cory Woodroof joins Will for a long conversation about Under the Silver Lake, the latest film from director David Robert Mitchell (It Follows), which stars Andrew Garfield and Riley Keough. Despite a lot of buzz surrounding this neo-noir thriller after premiering last year at Cannes Film Festival, A24 has only recently unleashed the mystery upon us hopeful cinemaholics. Is that for good reason? Dive in and find out!

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Cinemaholics Podcast #116 – Pokémon Detective Pikachu

We just have one movie following us around as we battle it out over Pokémon Detective Pikachu, a new live-action movie based on the video game, as well as the larger world of pocket monsters with so many games and merchandise, we couldn’t possibly hope to catch ’em all.

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‘Detective Pikachu’ Review – Your Pokémon Movie Says a Lot About You

In Pokémon Detective Pikachu, the rules of Pokémon and perhaps video game movies in general are turned on their head to seemingly serve a single purpose: give the people what they want. But what do audiences really want in a new Pokémon movie? A stylish film noir? A diversely casted Zootopia narrative? Dozens of CG monsters to adore and collect? The Ryan Reynolds brand of comedy under a PG rating? Or perhaps simply a reminder that when many of you were young, Pokémon (in some fashion) was a big deal to you, and now it can be a big deal to your kids.

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‘Long Shot’ Review – Seth Rogen and Charlize Theron Take on the Heart and Soul of Politics

Filmmakers generally build their stories around proven formulas. Either intentionally or not, most movies you see at your local theater follow a predictable series of set ups and payoffs. Sometimes this can be grating, and other times, it’s part of the charm. In one’s mundane day-to-day living, a familiar, run-of-the-mill story can be dull, meandering, or frustrating. You’ve almost certainly heard someone ask, “Why won’t Hollywood make something new?” But in other cases, a film that’s light, good-natured, and winningly by-the-books can invoke a welcome sigh of relief.

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Cinemaholics Podcast #115 – Long Shot, Booksmart, Extremely Wicked Shockingly Evil and Vile, Tuca & Bertie, Knock Down the House

Special guest Abby Olcese joins us as we cast our ballots for Long Shot, a brand new political romantic comedy starring Charlize Theron and Seth Rogen. But that’s not all! School is out but the party is just getting started. We’re doing an early review for the upcoming bad teen comedy Booksmart, the first film directed by Olivia Wilde. And later in the show, we discuss three new releases on Netflix: Extremely Wicked Shockingly Evil and Vile, Tuca & Bertie, and Knock Down the House.

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