Extra Milestone – Toy Story (1995), Unbreakable (2000)

This week on Extra Milestone, I’m joined once more by my good friend Guy Simons Jr. to dissect a pair of (relatively) recent classics that have garnered acclaim over the years, and which have almost nothing whatsoever to do with each other! First up is Pixar’s groundbreaking debut feature Toy Story, the first-ever wholly computer animated movie that has gained a reputation as an indispensable landmark in special effects and storytelling. After that, we jump ahead to M. Night Shyamalan’s unconventional superhero story Unbreakable, a grounded deconstruction of the genre that arrived before cinema as a whole had become swept up in comic book storytelling, and which has amassed a sizable (and well-earned) cult following.

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Extra Milestone – Raging Bull (1980), One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

Even in the midst of a year as hectic and unconventional as this one, Oscar season is still in full swing when it comes to this week’s selection of heavy hitters. Joining me once again for the first time in nearly three years is Maria Garcia, my former partner in crime from such shows as Now Conspiring and Part-Time Characters, and we’re discussing two films often hailed as being among the greatest of all time! We begin with Raging Bull, the morally complex sports biopic that saved Martin Scorsese’s life and has developed a widely varied legacy, and which one of us isn’t especially fond of! From there, we rewind the clock to visit Miloš Forman’s award season darling One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, a wholly unique classic within film history that holds up wonderfully to this day.

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Extra Milestone – All About Eve (1950), Rebel Without A Cause (1955)

To close out the month of October, we’re reviewing two of the best films of the 1950s, and also trying out a new format for the show! First up is my conversation with Rob Wilkinson on Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s All About Eve, an all-star drama with a record-breaking number of Oscar nominations, and which happens to be a fantastic exploration of the unforgiving theater world. After that, I chat with my Anyway, That’s All I Got cohost Anthony Battaglia about Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without A Cause, a landmark teen drama featuring an indelible posthumous performance by James Dean, and which is also fantastic!

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Extra Milestone – Dances With Wolves (1990), The Magnificent Seven (1960), To Sleep With Anger (1990)

Adonis Gonzalez, my cohost on A Nice Place to Visit and Game Over, Man!, is back on the show to discuss a trio of movies that have nothing to do with each other…or do they? Tune in to hear our conversation on Kevin Costner’s Oscar-Winning epic Dances With Wolves, John Sturges’ iconic western remake The Magnificent Seven, and Charles Burnett’s engrossing family drama To Sleep With Anger!

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Extra Milestone – The Elephant Man (1980), After Hours (1985), Close-Up (1990)

Will Ashton returns to Extra Milestone yet again to chart an unusual cinematic path across the 1980s and 1990s! We begin with an examination of David Lynch’s The Elephant Man, including our thoughts on the story’s emotional core, trivia on why the film is significant to the history of the academy, our impressions of David Lynch, and more! From there, we return to the films of Martin Scorsese with After Hours, an unusual and underseen comedic outing from the acclaimed director, and we close out the show by bringing the films of Abbas Kiarostami into focus with Close-Up, a hybrid documentary exploring the very nature and function of cinema.

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Extra Milestone – Psycho (1960), Se7en (1995)

Guy Simons Jr. (of Anyway, That’s All I Got fame) joins me for the first time on Extra Milestone for a special Halloween episode devoted to two of the greatest serial killer movies of all time! Kicking off our conversation is Alfred Hitchcock’s game-changing masterpiece Psycho, including the unique and revolutionary distribution of the film, the ways in which it insidiously sets itself apart from every other movie, whether or not it should be considered a ‘slasher,’ and more! After that, we jump forward to David Fincher’s haunting detective thriller Se7en, a movie which one of us had somehow never seen until now! We also discuss the film’s somewhat troubled legacy, the ways in which it has infiltrated the internet consciousness, and even some valuable insight on whether or not it should be viewed as an optimistic film!

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Extra Milestone – Goodfellas (1990), Dog Day Afternoon (1975)

Cinemaholics host Jon Negroni returns to Extra Milestone for a double feature of two of the greatest films of all time! We start by discussing Sidney Lumet’s 1975 crime thriller Dog Day Afternoon, a revolutionary and dynamic film that remains just as relevant 45 years later, if not even more so. From there, we move on to Martin Scorsese’s career-defining classic Goodfellas, which we believe may potentially hold the title as the greatest gangster film of them all, in addition to being expertly crafted in every way.

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Extra Milestone – Sunset Boulevard (1950), The Gold Rush (1925)

Emily Kubincanek returns to Extra Milestone at last, and in no small fashion! We’re diving headfirst into the most Classic of Cinema with two brilliant films that connect to the Silent Era! First up is Charlie Chaplin’s The Gold Rush, a dramatic comedy featuring Chaplin’s ‘Little Tramp’ that cemented many dramatic traditions while simultaneously telling a heartfelt and humorous story! From there, we jump forward to Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard, which examines the world of showbusiness, the remnants of the Silent Era, and the widespread sacrifices found in Hollywood living through a melancholy lens steeped in Film Noir tradition.

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Extra Milestone – Rashomon (1950), The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975)

The pairings keep getting stranger and stranger every week, and this week’s show is no exception! Special guest Ryan Oliver joins Sam and Jon to tackle two very different classics, starting with Akira Kurosawa’s massively influential 1950 arthouse classic Rashomon. We discuss everything from our differing experiences with the film, how multiple viewings have yielded different interpretations, and why the film has remained so meaningful even after 70 years. After that, we take a huge left turn toward Transylvania to examine the legacy and power of Jim Sharman’s 1975 genre-defining cult classic The Rocky Horror Picture Show, which one of us doesn’t like! It’s another collection of varied experiences complete with a litany of recommendations to go along with both films!

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Extra Milestone – Wanda (1970), Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985), Vagabond (1985)

To officially commence the Milestone month of August, Will Ashton and Andrew McMahon make their long-awaited returns to help break down a unique and unexpected triple feature, the likes of which the podcast world may have never seen before. We begin with an analysis of Barbara Loden’s Wanda, the first film to be written, directed, and led by a female filmmaker. We follow this up with a look back at Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, the iconic feature debut of Tim Burton. Finally, we dive into the work of the great Agnès Varda with an observational look at her acclaimed and influential film Vagabond.

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Extra Milestone – Come and See (1985), Back to the Future (1985)

Things are getting real heavy this week, because Adonis Gonzalez is here to talk about the two best movies of 1985, which happen to be radically different from one another! We start with a harrowing exploration of Elem Klimov’s Come and See, an anti-war film depicting the Nazi invasion of Belorussia through the eyes of a young boy. We discuss the history of the film’s reputation, the drama associated with the production, the way that it emerges as (potentially) the only War movie that actually matters, and why we find it so difficult to even recommend. After that, we were happy to cleanse our palate with a discussion on Robert Zemeckis’s iconic Sci-Fi Family Comedy Back to the Future, covering its deft narrative construction, effective antagonist, and curious soundtrack decisions, as well as a deserved commendation for the recently deceased Ron Cobb.

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Extra Milestone – The Night of the Hunter (1955), Airplane! (1980)

Sam Noland is back on Extra Milestone after a week’s respite to take on, along with friend and coworker Robert Wilkinson, two radically different classics. First up is Charles Laughton’s gothic thriller The Night of the Hunter, which stars Robert Mitchum as a psychopathic priest hunting down two children during the Great Depression. Next up on our itinerary is the landmark spoof comedy Airplane!, the laugh-a-minute lampooning of pop cinema celebrating 40 years of making the world howl with laughter.

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Extra Milestone – The Apartment (1960)

Hey there, buddy-boys and buddy-gals! This week, we might just have the key to your next favorite movie, The Apartment, which recently celebrated 60 years since its initial release. Widely considered to be one of Billy Wilder’s true masterpieces, this romantic dramedy stars Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, and Fred McMurray. We discuss the film’s impact on our own movie-going lives, play some of our favorite clips, and have a spirited debate about this either being a “Christmas movie” or a “New Year’s” movie.

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Extra Milestone – Jaws (1975), The Empire Strikes Back (1980)

This week’s Extra Milestone is so iconic that we may just need a bigger boat. Anthony Battaglia reunites with Sam to discuss two immensely significant blockbusters that have irreparably shaped the cinematic landscape. We start with a discussion on Steven Spielberg’s Jaws, including our differing experiences with the movie, our appreciation for the writing and acting, differences from Peter Benchley’s novel, a confession as to our shared fear of open water, and even an extremely hot take involving the infamous sequels! After we dry off from that conversation, we take an isolated look at Irvin Kershner’s The Empire Strikes Back and how it changed Star Wars (and sequels in general) forever, why it maintains its effectiveness after dozens of viewings, why we can never view the Dagobah sequence the same way again, whether or not it contains the best lightsaber battle ever, and the dichotomy between good and evil that was solidified in this film.

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Extra Milestone – The Shining (1980), Gremlins (1984), Gremlins 2: The New Batch (1990)

It’s all play and no work on this week’s Extra Milestone, because Jason Read has returned to the show to discuss a trio of very different movies. We begin with a detailed exploration of Stanley Kubrick’s Horror masterpiece The Shining, complete with reflections on why the terror of it is so effective, analyses of the movie’s themes and mysteries, a discussion of why method acting is a flawed and unnecessary process, and even a few personal stories that relate to the movie. Afterward, we take on Joe Dante’s Gremlins, stopping along the way to discuss its implementation of cinematic language, its historical significance, and all of the darkly comedic chaos that comes with it. Finally, we cap off the show with a fittingly sporadic look at Dante’s oft-overlooked sequel Gremlins 2: The New Batch, which is one of the most entertaining movies either of us have ever seen, as well as being a knowing satire of culture stuffed with enough cameos and mania to last a lifetime.

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Extra Milestone – Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), The Blues Brothers (1980)

In what is certainly the most comedically inclined Extra Milestone yet, I am joined by my very close personal friend Tyler Chambers to discuss a pair of classics within the genre. We begin with a lengthy rundown of Terry Jones and Terry Gilliam’s 1975 cult favorite Monty Python and the Holy Grail, complete with behind-the-scenes stories, details we’ve noticed over the years, our personal experiences with the movie, analyses of the film’s comedic stylings, and revisits of our favorite sequences. Then we move on to John Landis’s 1980 musical road comedy The Blues Brothers. We discuss the film’s story structure, cast, presentation, and deadpan sense of humor, as well as how all of those things compare and contrast surprisingly well with Holy Grail. Afterward, we both give a recommendation to pair with each movie, some much more unexpected than others!

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Extra Milestone – La Dolce Vita (1960)

Jon Negroni makes his long-awaited return to Extra Milestone to investigate Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita, one of his very favorite films. For 60 years, the film has gained a reputation of being one of the most insightful and layered journeys of World Cinema, and I had a wonderful time learning about its many rich cinematic attributes from Jon. Tune in to hear the two of us break down the film’s cinematography, the way it uses the city of Rome to help tell its story, the many exciting chapters that comprise the plot, and more!

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Extra Milestone – Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975)

Settle in, listeners, because Julia Teti is back for this week’s Extra Milestone, and it’s for an undertaking of very subtle, methodical proportions. Julia and I have decided to touch on the most famous work of the late, great Chantal Akerman with her three-hour 1975 art house classic Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai Du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles. Celebrating 45 years this past May, the film has been revered by nearly all who have seen it, and continues to signify a wholly unique exploration of a day-to-day life seldom seen to this extent in cinema. With a legacy almost as impressive as its title and runtime, the two of us had plenty to say about this monolithic milestone that continues to have a tremendous impact today.

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Extra Milestone – Friday the 13th (1980), Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Re-Animator (1985)

The summer is about to conclude with a creeping, atmospheric, gory bang, because Emily Kubincanek is back on The Extra Milestone to discuss a trio of Horror Classics! We start with a look at Sean S. Cunningham’s iconic slasher Friday the 13th, and how it sets itself apart from other such films, as well as the excitement of it all that still plays today. We continue with a discussion of James Whale’s sequel Bride of Frankenstein, including the similarities to Mary Shelley’s novel and how Universal crafted a new narrative around the characters. Finally, we dive into the hellish effects showcase that is the late Stuart Gordon’s Re-Animator!

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Extra Milestone – All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

Hold on to your helmets, listeners, because the illustrious Julia Teti is back on the Cinemaholics feed! And not a moment too soon, because the two of us are joined by the scintillating Will Ashton to make Extra Milestone history by tackling our second Best Picture Winner, our second 1930s Film, and our first War (and Anti-War) Film with Lewis Milestone’s All Quiet on the Western Front! Celebrating 90 years this past April, the film has built a deserved legacy of being one of the most effective condemnations of combat and warfare in cinema history, and the three of us have plenty to say to support that. The film’s storied production, its unique and controversial release, its eternal relevancy, and much more are discussed, and we even take the time to recommend some complimentary films! You’re not gonna want to miss this one.

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Extra Milestone – The Passenger (1975), Peeping Tom (1960)

In what will likely go down as the nerdiest and most esoteric Extra Milestone yet, I am joined by my good friend and fellow hardcore cinephile Andrew McMahon to discuss a pair of significant, influential, and all-around great films. We begin with a lengthy discussion of Michelangelo Antonioni’s reflective 1975 thriller The Passenger, in addition to Antonioni’s career as a whole that we’re familiar with, followed by a look at Michael Powell’s career-ending 1960 horror film Peeping Tom. We get into a lot of exciting history and interconnectivity to the greater cinematic art form over the course of both conversations, and we hope it’s just as fun to listen to as it was to record.

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Extra Milestone – The Grapes of Wrath (1940), Terror of MechaGodzilla (1975), How to Train Your Dragon (2010)

Promises are being fulfilled left and right on this week’s Extra Milestone, in which the long-awaited debut of podcast veteran Adonis Gonzalez finally takes place! Adonis and I have a trio of dramatically contrasting movies to discuss, starting with a lengthy exploration of John Ford’s depression-era adaptation of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. We continue with a discussion of Ishirō Honda’s character-defining Kaijū film (as well as Godzilla’s Shōwa Era as a whole) with Terror of MechaGodzilla, and we conclude with a celebration of the 10-year anniversary of Dreamworks’s How to Train Your Dragon. It was great to podcast with Adonis once more, and we hope to unite even more in the future. Enjoy!

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Extra Milestone – Rebecca (1940), Le Trou (1960)

Special guest Emily Kubincanek joins us for a double milestone feature of Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca, which just celebrated 80 years since its release, as well as Jacques Becker’s final film Le Trou (or The Hole), which recently had its 60th anniversary. As always, we lay out the context for what makes these films so memorable all these years later, plus there’s a little contention between the Cinemaholics on both films, so stay tuned to hear where we all land.

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Extra Milestone – Breathless (1960), Eyes Without A Face (1960), Deep Red (1975)

In what will go down as the very first triple header in Extra Milestone history, I am joined once again by Anyway, That’s All I Got veteran Jason Read! Jason and I take a look at both the French New Wave and the work of Jean-Luc Godard with Breathless (1960), explore a fantastic and somewhat lesser-known horror classic with Eyes Without A Face (1960), and round out the show with an exploration of the Giallo subgenre and the work of Dario Argento with the fiendishly frightening Deep Red (1975). Although we went heavily into detail with Breathless, we took special care not to give too much away about the latter two films, so feel free to listen to those segments whether they are old favorites or completely new to you. It’s a delightful series of conversations that traverses a broad section of the cinematic landscape, and we hope it’s just as fun to listen to as it was to record!

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Extra Milestone – Seven Chances (1925)

The Extra Milestone crew has so far been “silent” when it comes to covering silent films, and for that, we have no excuse. But consider this deep dive of Buster Keaton’s comedic classic Seven Chances to be our comeuppance! That’s right, the screwball romantic comedy that helped define the genre recently celebrated 95 glorious years, making this the oldest film we’ve ever covered on the show. You’ll laugh, you’ll cry (from laughing), and just maybe you’ll fall in love with one of the greatest actor-directors in all of film history.

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Extra Milestone – Pinocchio (1940)

When you wish upon a Pod, doesn’t matter which host you are. When you wish upon a Pod, your streams come true. That’s right. We’re celebrating the 80th anniversary of Pinocchio this month on Extra Milestone. But first, a quick word from our good friend, Willt—I mean Walt Disney. Also, be sure to stick around toward the end of the show for a major announcement concerning the Extra Milestone podcast!

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Extra Milestone – Young Frankenstein (1974)

It’s been over four decades, and Mel Brooks still has us laughing. As we mark the 45th anniversary of Young Frankenstein, Jon and Sam discuss the spooky comedy’s legacy as one of our latest “Extra Milestone” films. Starring Gene Wilder, Peter Boyle, Marty Feldman, Teri Garr, and many more familiar faces, Young Frankenstein proves that even a parody film can be just as thrilling and satisfying as a bonafide sequel in the Universal Monsters canon.

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Extra Milestone – On the Waterfront (1954) and Rear Window (1954)

We like to think of ourselves as contenders, so for August and September, Sam and Will are doing a double review of On the Waterfront from director Elia Kazan and Rear Window from Alfred Hitchcock. Both films came out in 1954 and are thus celebrating 65 glorious years at the cinema.

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Extra Milestone – Easy Rider (1969) and Do the Right Thing (1989)

It might be several weeks late, but July’s EXTRA MILESTONE is here! With Jon away on vacation, Will Ashton and Sam Noland decided to tackle not one, but two notable classics celebrating anniversaries. First up is Dennis Hopper’s Easy Rider, the counterculture classic celebrating its 50th anniversary, followed by Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing, the eternally relevant commentary on racial tensions celebrating its 30th anniversary.

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Extra Milestone – Some Like it Hot (1959)

This month for our Extra Milestone series, we’re discussing the classic Billy Wilder comedy Some Like It Hot, celebrating 60 years since its release on March 29,1959. Joining us is Sam Noland, our Movie of the Week columnist. In this discussion, we cover the background and legacy of the film, which stars Marilyn Monroe, Jack Lemmon, and Tony Curtis. Afterward, we dive into the plot of the film with clips and our own double entendres.

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Extra Milestone – It Happened One Night (1934)

For our debut episode of a bonus series we’re calling Extra Milestone, Sam Noland joins us as we celebrate the 85th anniversary of Frank Capra’s It Happened One Night, which was released on February 22, 1934 and stars Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert. Largely hailed as the first screwball comedy and an early precursor to the modern rom-com, this is one film you’ll definitely want to cross off your cinematic bucket list, or perhaps revisit.

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