the suicide squad
Cinemaholics Podcasts

Cinemaholics Podcast #232 – The Suicide Squad

So, what, we’re reviewing some new Suicide Squad movie? Close. It’s The Suicide Squad, this time, a standalone sequel and/or soft reboot of 2016’s Suicide Squad, now directed by James Gunn. But this isn’t your stepdad’s PG-13 Marvel space jam. Nope, this is an R-rated action comedy featuring a massive ensemble cast, which includes the return of Margot Robbie as Harley Quinn and Viola Davis as Amanda Waller, but also new characters played by Idris Elba, John Cena, Daniela Melchior, David Dastmalchian, and the voice of Sylvester Stallone. Later in the show, we also review Leo Carax’s new arthouse musical Annette, which stars Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard. Then Vivo, a Netflix animated musical from Sony starring Lin-Manuel Miranda.

rise of skywalker
Reads Reviews

‘The Rise of Skywalker’ is a Balancing Act of Star Wars at its Best. And Worst.

With The Rise of Skywalker, we now have a definitive conclusion to the latest official trilogy from the official kingmakers at Disney, who set out to construct a brand new direction for a boundless franchise. As a capper to this corner of stories, The Rise of Skywalker is an incredible finale, no question. But like its central opposing forces, it’s filled with all the bad and only most of the good there is to be found in blockbuster cinema’s most beloved — and scrutinized — canon.

men in black
Cinemaholics Podcasts

Cinemaholics Podcast #121 – Men in Black: International, The Dead Don’t Die, Changeland

Suit up. Jon and Will are back in black to discuss Men in Black: International, the fourth film in the franchise, now starring Chris Hemsworth and Tessa Thompson as the memory-wiping, alien-saving agents. They also discuss the lackluster summer box office in 2019 and how this may affect theatrical releases in the future. And you’ll hear reviews for Jim Jarmusch’s “dry zombie comedy” The Dead Don’t Die and Seth Green’s directorial debut Changeland.

man who killed don quixote
Reads Reviews

‘The Man Who Killed Don Quixote’ Review – Terry Gilliam’s Delayed, Surreal Fantasy Finally Becomes A Reality

For many film fans, Terry Gilliam’s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote has taken on a bit of a mythic quality since its inception. Either fittingly or ironically, this long-in-the-works passion project centered (in part) around the literary icon is one that has often alluded the Brazil director. For the past 30 years, Gilliam has tried — with only fleeting success — to bring this mischievous fable to the big screen. Despite every intention and aspiration to make it a reality, Don Quixote yet remained a fantasy.