the green knight
Cinemaholics Podcasts

Cinemaholics Podcast – The Green Knight

Special guest Alisha Grauso joins our roundtable to discuss The Green Knight, a new A24 fantasy epic from director/screenwriter David Lowery (A Ghost Story). The film stars Dev Patel as Sir Gawain, King Arthur’s nephew, who embarks on a dark, existential, anti-hero’s journey to his own doom. The film also stars Alicia Vikander, Joel Edgerton, Sarita Choudhury, Sean Harris, Barry Keoghan, Kate Dickie, and Ralph Ineson. And it’s loosely based on the poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

the green knight
Reads Reviews

‘The Green Knight’ is a masterful deconstruction of both Arthurian legend and modern fantasy

It turns out there’s still plenty of creativity and emotional stakes to be mined from the furiously picked over lore of King Arthur and his roundtable. The Green Knight openly advertises itself as a loose adaptation of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, an anonymously-written poem that has long been considered an uncomfortable sticking point for religious authors and perhaps filmmakers who aren’t all that interested in tackling the spiritual politics between Christianity and the pagan roots of British folklore. Thank god (or gods?) for David Lowery.

new mutants
Cinemaholics Podcasts

Cinemaholics Podcast #183 – The New Mutants, Bill & Ted Face the Music, The Personal History of David Copperfield

Special guest Charlie Ridgely joins the show for our long-awaited review of The New Mutants, the final X-Men comic-book movie made by Fox…which was shot three years ago. We also discuss Bill & Ted Face the Music, the third installment in the beloved franchise starring Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter. And last we tackle The Personal History of David Copperfield, a new adaptation of the classic Charles Dickens novel, and this one stars Dev Patel and was directed by Armando Iannucci.

personal history of david copperfield
Reads Reviews

‘The Personal History Of David Copperfield’ is a Fun, but Flimsy, Dickens Adaptation

I’ll never claim to be a great source of knowledge when it comes to the works of Charles Dickens. My familiarity with his words derive through other sources, mainly various adaptations of varying faithfulness or stylistic-to-bombastic re-imaginings of his material that may or may not honor the “spirit” of his original scribbles. Therefore, I cannot tell you whether or not The Personal History of David Copperfield is a fitting adaptation, nor if it properly honors Dickens’ long-standing legacy and cultural relevance. But here’s what I can tell you.