mainstream
Cinemaholics Podcasts

Cinemaholics Podcast #219 – Mainstream

Even if Cinemaholics isn’t your main stream, we hope you join us for our review of Mainstream, a new indie satire from IFC Films starring Andrew Garfield, Maya Hawke, Nat Wolff, and Jason Schwartzman. Also on the show, we’re covering a few mini reviews, including “Jupiter’s Legacy” on Netflix and David Oyelowo’s feature directorial debut, The Water Man. And we finish things up with some discussion of the new Netflix drama Monster starring Kelvin Harrison Jr. and coming-of-age 90s dramedy Pink Skies Ahead from first-time director Kelly Oxford.

the nest
Reads Reviews

‘The Nest’ Proves that Real Life Can Be Just as Scary as a Horror Movie

Directed and written by Sean Durkin in his latest film since 2011, The Nest tells the story of Rory O’Hara, portrayed by Jude Law, who after a seemingly successful life of entrepreneurism in the States, moves back to London in the late 1980s so he can work for his old company. Along with his loving wife Allison (Carrie Coon) and their children Samantha and Ben (Oona Roche and Charlie Shotwell), the family moves into a luxurious, countryside house, and as this summary might hint, things begin to take a “twisted turn” once they arrive.

one and only ivan
Cinemaholics Podcasts

Cinemaholics Podcast #182 – The One and Only Ivan, Tesla, Words on Bathroom Walls

The two and only Cinemaholics are back to review The One and Only Ivan, a new Disney+ family feature starring Bryan Cranston, Sam Rockwell, Danny DeVito, Angelina Jolie, and many more. We also go back in time in a fun way with our discussion of Tesla, the Sundance biopic from IFC Films starring Ethan Hawke. And we finish the show with a review of Words on Bathroom Walls, the new YA teen romance starring Charlie Plummer and Taylor Russell.

Tesla
Reads Reviews

‘Tesla’ is a Shockingly Tame Biopic with Sparks of Hope

Tesla stars Ethan Hawke as the titular inventor who navigates life in the 1800s, one of America’s most “brainstormy” times. Around him are a handful of equally inventive and enigmatic characters, such as Anne Morgan, portrayed by Eve Hewson, and George Westinghouse, portrayed by Jim Gaffigan. And of course, you can’t have a Tesla movie without his famous frenemy and rival in the electricity circuit, Thomas Edison; a role that is perfectly performed by Kyle MacLachlan in small doses. Edison isn’t in the film a whole lot, but he manages to steal the show in a manner accurate to how his real-life inspiration repeatedly stole Tesla’s thunder.

Sputnik
Reads Reviews

In ‘Sputnik,’ the Alien Horror Movie Reviews You

Personally, I believe the horror genre doesn’t get nearly enough credit these days. I’ve struggled to figure out just why that is. Perhaps it’s because of the over-saturation of the genre, the fact that there are quite literally hundreds of films to choose from, many of them admittedly not exactly something to write home about. Maybe it’s because even when horror was at its peak, when the big monsters like Dracula or Jason Voorhees spooked audiences during the Halloween season, horror was advertised as something of a niche genre; meant only for those who could truly appreciate the shock, schlock, and gore of a scary movie. Or maybe it’s because no on-screen jump scare could ever compare to the horrors of reality that many of us have to live through on a daily basis. Either way, the horror genre is pretty underappreciated and often times overlooked when awards season comes around.

Reads Reviews

‘The Nightingale’ Review – Jennifer Kent Chases Demons in this Harrowing Tale

Cruelty is currency, and salvation is nothing more than a branch thrown into a ravaging, rapid river. This is the world Jennifer Kent throws her audience, unwillingly, into for her sophomore feature, The Nightingale. A divisive and often outright dread-inducing picture, Kent’s film rides through the Tasmanian wilderness with a steadfast purpose, to confront and kill the colonizing demons that haunt her main characters by body and land. To an extent, the vindictiveness of Kent’s picture thrives in the lush greenery of Tasmania. But the bonds that hold her characters together break under pressure.