Extra Milestone Podcasts

Extra Milestone – Brazil (1985), Edward Scissorhands (1990)

To officially conclude this year’s Extra Milestone lineup, Jon Negroni and Will Ashton of the Cinemaholics podcast joined forces with me one last time to discuss two distinct (and oddly holiday-centric) auteur-driven classics. We start our conversation by digging through the muck of Terry Gilliam’s Brazil, a bureaucratic odyssey of madness often regarded as one of the greatest films of all time. After that, we jump forward to Edward Scissorhands, an intensely personal story from Tim Burton that is both lighthearted and melancholy, and which has affected us all at one point or another.

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Extra Milestone Podcasts

Extra Milestone – Wanda (1970), Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure (1985), Vagabond (1985)

To officially commence the Milestone month of August, Will Ashton and Andrew McMahon make their long-awaited returns to help break down a unique and unexpected triple feature, the likes of which the podcast world may have never seen before. We begin with an analysis of Barbara Loden’s Wanda, the first film to be written, directed, and led by a female filmmaker. We follow this up with a look back at Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure, the iconic feature debut of Tim Burton. Finally, we dive into the work of the great Agnès Varda with an observational look at her acclaimed and influential film Vagabond.

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Cinemaholics Podcasts

Cinemaholics Podcast #110 – Dumbo, The Beach Bum

The inmates are running the asylum this week as Jon is absent for mysterious reasons and Will takes over the show to ramble about Danny DeVito, Sad Clowns, and his enemy list with special guest Cory Woodroof! Later in the show, Will is high on his own supply — i.e. the sound of his own voice — as he spews more nonsense about Harmony Korine in a prolonged, in-depth conversation about The Beach Bum, starring a far-out Matthew McConaughey. All this and more as fans begin to get worried about Jon’s sudden disappearance.

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Reads Reviews

‘Dumbo’ Review – You’ll Believe an Elephant Can Fly, But Tim Burton Doesn’t Reach New Heights

If there’s one adjective I typically abhor when it comes to describing films, it’s “cute.” Cute, to my disgruntled ears, comes off as cheap, lazy, and non-descriptive. It’s a broad word that doesn’t really get to the meat of one’s feelings beyond the surface level. It’s a deflection term, often used to describe the exterior of a film while avoiding anything specific, intellectual, or meaningful. It’s an inoffensive word, certainly; there’s really no sense in getting mad about its overuse beyond my (admittedly) overbearingly high literary standards. But I still find it ceaselessly grating. What exactly does it mean to be “cute” anyway? It looks nice? A squeaky-clean disposition? Positive vibes? Good morals? It’s a placeholder word when others fail you.