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Vote for Our Next Extra Milestone: Pinocchio, La Dolce Vita, Brazil, The Breakfast Club (And More!)

The time has come yet again for you, our most loyal and dedicated of listeners, to do the hardest part of our job for us by deciding which film to delve into on the next Extra Milestone! February yielded a fascinating and varied selection, and it was hard enough to narrow it down to a measly seven. But now is the time to select the ultimate winner. You may choose from the following:

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The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) dir. Robert Wiene

Our (potential) first centennial celebration comes in the form of the ultimate showing of silent German Expressionism, a film that has now impacted cinematic aesthetics for over a century.

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Pinocchio (1940) dir. Ben Sharpsteen, Hamilton Luske

Still regarded as one of the company’s finest creations, Disney’s second animated feature has remained relevant, iconic, and formative all of these 80 years later.

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The Virgin Spring (1960) dir. Ingmar Bergman

Though not the first (or last) collaboration between Bergman and the late Max Von Sydow, this moral tale is seen as one of their best, and was adapted into Wes Craven’s debut feature The Last House on the Left.

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La Dolce Vita (1960) dir. Federico Fellini

Widely considered to be one of the greatest and most successful European movies of its time, Federico Fellini’s three-hour expressionist masterwork could be our first jaunt through 1960 cinema.

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The Stepford Wives (1975) dir. Bryan Forbes

Though not frequently mentioned in casual conversation, this chilling sci-fi horror/thriller has affected nearly all who have seen it, including director Jordan Peele, who cited this as a major influence on Get Out.

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Brazil (1985) dir. Terry Gilliam

Mind-bending doesn’t fully describe this aggressively delightful, yet staggeringly dystopian, sci-fi influence on a generation still reeling from the proto-capitalist dominance of the 1980s.

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The Breakfast Club (1985) dir. John Hughes

They just don’t make high school movies like they used to, though in many cases, filmmakers are still riffing on ways to re-capture the punk spirit of John Hughes’ endlessly imitable teen classic. 

And there you have it! Choose wisely,  and tune in within the next few weeks to see what ends up being selected!

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7 Comments

  1. Tough choice this month! But I’m gonna go for nostalgia, one of my favorite Disney animations as a kid: Pinocchio. 😊

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